How to Boost Mobile Game Performance and Battery Life on Your Android 


This post is by Brendan Hesse from Lifehacker


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As mobile games get more sophisticated and their graphics get better and beefier, smartphones require higher hardware specs in order for these games to look great. Whether your smartphone is brand-new or showing its age a bit, you can probably squeak out higher frame rates. Tweak your phone or tablet’s display…

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How to Block Autoplay Videos Using Firefox


This post is by Mike Epstein from Lifehacker


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No one likes autoplay videos. A random assault of sound that you may or may not have come to see is rarely a pleasant surprise. This week, Firefox received an update that adds a new, robust tool for blocking the audio from autoplay videos from any site, which makes web browsing much more comfortable.

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Netflix tests a mobile-only plan in select countries that costs $3


This post is by Shannon Liao from The Verge - All Posts


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Netflix is testing a new mobile-only subscription plan in “select countries” including India that would only cost $3.63 a month. That’s half the cost of Netflix’s Indian basic streaming plan, which covers all devices and costs $7.27 (INR500), as spotted by Variety.

Netflix told The Verge in a statement, “We are always looking for ways to make Netflix more enjoyable and accessible. We will be testing different options in select countries, where members can, for example, watch Netflix on their mobile device for a lower price and subscribe in shorter increments of time.” That last part is intriguing, as it could mean that Netflix starts weekly or biweekly subscriptions instead of monthly plans.

Since it’s a test,…

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Clark, a venture-backed tutoring platform, will now help tutors build their own sites


This post is by Connie Loizos from TechCrunch


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A couple of years ago, Clark, a New York-based startup, appeared on the scene with tutoring software that aimed to both make it easier for educators to start and manage a tutoring business by handling on its platform all the work that tutors struggle to find time to do, from drumming up students, to managing scheduling and payments, to making it far simpler to communicate with parents.

Today the company is announcing a bit of a shift, moving away from simply selling access to its business software for a monthly subscription fee and helping tutors set up their very own storefronts, replete with websites, certifications, marketing materials, and even clients who Clark is helping them to find.

How it will work, from a dollars standpoint: Clark will charge an upfront fee for setting up the business and getting it off the ground, then charge a smaller monthly fee for

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Netflix is experimenting with different episode orders for its new anthology show


This post is by Andrew Liptak from The Verge - All Posts


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When it comes to watching television, viewers typically watch everything in the same order — the show will either have a certain broadcast order, or its story will be such that watching it out of order would turn it into nonsense. With its new anthology series Love, Death + Robots, Netflix tried something new: testing out different episode orders to see which performed the best.

For such an anthology series, where each episode stands on their own, you don’t have to worry about making sure that you’re watching things in any particular order — there isn’t one. But how you watch might change how you experience the episodes.

After viewers noticed episodes shifting from viewer to viewer, Netflix explained the discrepancy in a tweet. “We’ve…

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Google Stadia wants YouTubers to play with fans, but that could leave creators open to attacks


This post is by Julia Alexander from The Verge - All Posts


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Google wants its upcoming game-streaming service, Stadia, to up the ante for live-streamed games on YouTube, but Google didn’t address the many ways its system could lead to harassment, demonetization, and other problems for creators

One of Stadia’s most exciting developments for YouTube creators is “Crowd Play,” a feature that allows creators to play games like NBA 2K19 with their viewers. It seems like a good idea on the surface, but Google’s presentation didn’t mention any potential harms that could come from Crowd Play. For just over an hour, multiple members of Google’s Stadia team and YouTube’s head of gaming, Ryan Wyatt, spoke about the benefits Stadia had for players and creators. Gaming is more seamless, Google Stadia chief Phil…

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Study confirms AT&T’s fake 5G E network is still just LTE


This post is by Cameron Faulkner from The Verge - All Posts


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AT&T’s 5G E network isn’t actually 5G. You probably knew that, but since we’ll never get tired of dunking on it, a new study (via Ars Technica) now shows that 5G E isn’t just misleading, it proves that AT&T’s current 4G LTE speeds can actually be slower than other carriers who employ similar LTE Advanced and Advanced Pro technologies. Perhaps this is why AT&T is trying to sweep the lie under the rug.

The study by Opensignal measured and compared download speeds from AT&T’s 5G E network to the results from other carriers’ 4G LTE services. From Ars Technica:

OpenSignal data is based on crowdsourced speed tests that can be performed by anyone using OpenSignal’s apps for iPhone and Android. OpenSignal told us today’s report is based on tests…

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Gates-backed Lumotive upends lidar conventions using metamaterials


This post is by Devin Coldewey from TechCrunch


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Pretty much every self-driving car on the road, not to mention many a robot and drone, uses lidar to sense its surroundings. But useful as lidar is, it also involves physical compromises that limit its capabilities. Lumotive is a new company with funding from Bill Gates and Intellectual Ventures that uses metamaterials to exceed those limits, perhaps setting a new standard for the industry.

The company is just now coming out of stealth, but it’s been in the works for a long time. I actually met with them back in 2017 when the project was very hush-hush and operating under a different name at IV’s startup incubator. If the terms “metamaterials” and “Intellectual Ventures” tickle something in your brain, it’s because the company has spawned several startups that use intellectual property developed there, building on the work of materials scientist David Smith.

Metamaterials are essentially specially engineered surfaces with

CG render of a lidar metamaterial chip.

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Bénédictine and Tequila Are Very Good Together


This post is by Claire Lower on Skillet, shared by Claire Lower to Lifehacker from Lifehacker


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Though I love introducing you all to new and exciting bottles, my bar cart is rapidly filling up, so I’ve been trying to find new and exciting ways to use up the alcohol I already have. My process for doing so is pretty advanced: I google random combinations of the ethanol I own until I find something that sounds good.

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Blast This Playlist While You Get Ready to Go Out


This post is by Nick Douglas from Lifehacker


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When I’m getting ready to party, music is crucial. It’s the overture to the whole night of carousal (or of chatting on the couch in someone’s living room with a clear plastic cup of Two Buck Chuck). With the help of the Lifehacker team, Gizmodo Media colleagues, and Twitter followers, I’ve lined up eight whopping…

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Apple is reportedly launching truly wireless Powerbeats earbuds in April


This post is by Dami Lee from The Verge - All Posts


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Apple’s Beats is getting ready to launch truly wireless Powerbeats earbuds in April, CNET reports. CNET’s source, who it says is close to the retail channel, says the new earbuds will reportedly use Apple’s new H1 chip which are used in the new wireless charging AirPods, and have the same always-on Siri voice assistant. It’s also expected to have a longer battery life than the AirPods, which have around five hours of listening time.

CNET points out that the timing of the new wireless Powerbeats lines up with when the BeatsX were announced, which was shortly after Apple first introduced AirPods in 2016. Rumors of higher-end AirPods have been circulating since last year, suggesting that they would be noise-canceling, over-ear headphones….

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Intel abandons development of modular Compute Cards


This post is by Chris Welch from The Verge - All Posts


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Intel has ended further development of the company’s Compute Cards, as confirmed by Tom’s Hardware. The credit-card-sized device contained the fundamental guts of a PC — processor, storage, RAM, wireless modem, etc. — and was meant to make it simple for companies to create docking station-like products that could be upgraded as Intel released new versions. You’d just pop out the old Compute Card and insert the latest hardware. Intel first showcased the device at CES 2017.

But now the Compute Card story will end after just a single generation of Intel’s 7th Gen processors; this modular dream never even made it to its first upgrade hop. “We continue to believe modular computing is a market where there are many opportunities for…

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Mailchimp and Shopify break up


This post is by Frederic Lardinois from TechCrunch


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Shopify today announced that the Mailchimp app, which let its users use their Shopify data to create targeted email campaigns, for example, is no longer available in its marketplace. The reason for this, Shopify says, is that it “had growing concerns about Mailchimp’s app because of the poor merchant experience and their refusal to respect our Partner Program Agreement.”

Clearly, this isn’t the most amicable divorce.

“It’s critical for our merchants to have accurate, complete insight into their businesses and customers, and this isn’t possible when Mailchimp locks in their data,” Shopify explains. “Specifically, Mailchimp refuses to synchronize customer information captured on merchants’ online stores and email opt-out preferences. As a result, our merchants, other apps, and partner ecosystem can’t reliably serve their customers or comply with privacy legislation.”

Unsurprisingly, Mailchimp’s side of the story is a bit different. “Yesterday, we asked Shopify to remove the Mailchimp

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Crunchyroll raises monthly subscription cost for the first time since it launched in 2006


This post is by NIck Statt from The Verge - All Posts


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Crunchyroll, a leading anime subscription service, is raising its monthly subscription cost to $7.99, up from $6.95. The price hike is the first time Crunchyroll has raised the price of its basic, most widely purchased plan since the service first launched in 2006. The changes go into effect for new users on May 1st, 2019. The news, first reported by TechCrunch, has since been confirmed by an email Crunchyroll has sent to subscribers.

“Crunchyroll has the world’s largest collection of anime and we are grateful to have focused on building out such a robust library over the last decade, without a price change in our company history,” a spokesperson told TechCrunch. “However, due to rising costs of content and infrastructure, now is the…

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Microsoft details how xCloud will let you play Xbox games on an Android phone


This post is by NIck Statt from The Verge - All Posts


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Google may have stolen the show at this year’s Game Developer Conference with its Stadia cloud gaming reveal, but Microsoft is hard at work on its own service, xCloud, that it’s already testing now. At a GDC developer session yesterday, Microsoft representatives from the xCloud team gave us a little more detail into how games designed for Xbox consoles will translate over to mobile devices, where players might be used to either a Bluetooth controller or on-screen touch controls.

xCloud, like Stadia, is designed to be a cloud gaming service that will stream high-quality, console and PC-grade experiences to any screen. Microsoft is starting with its existing Xbox library of games, with a focus on first-party titles like Forza Horizon 4,…

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Firefox is now a better iPad browser


This post is by Frederic Lardinois from TechCrunch


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Mozilla today announced a new iOS version of Firefox that has been specifically optimized for Apple’s iPad. Given the launch of the new iPad mini this week, that’s impeccable timing. It’s also an admission that building a browser for tablets is different from building a browser for phones, which is what Mozilla mostly focused on in recent years.

“We know that iPads aren’t just bigger versions of iPhones,” Mozilla writes in today’s announcement. “You use them differently, you need them for different things. So rather than just make a bigger version of our browser for iOS, we made Firefox for iPad look and feel like it was custom made for a tablet.”

So with this new version, Firefox for iPad gets support for iOS features like split screen and the ability to set Firefox as the default browser in Outlook for iOS. The team also optimized tab management for

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GoFundMe pledges to remove anti-vax campaigns


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GoFundMe is removing anti-vaxxers from its platform, according to an exclusive report by The Daily Beast. The company is currently conducting a review for anti-vax campaigns on the platform and will ban any fundraisers found to be promoting bad science.

GoFundMe confirmed the report to The Verge. “Campaigns raising money to promote misinformation about vaccines violate GoFundMe’s terms of service and will be removed from the platform,” a representative said.

The ban doesn’t seem to be enforced yet: a quick search on GoFundMe for “anti vaccine” still brought up a number of anti-vaccination campaigns, including a number of campaigns associated with Andrew Wakefield’s Vaxxed series. Vaxxed was one of the anti-vax documentaries Amazon…

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Talk about the big news from GDC with TechCrunch writers


This post is by Eric Eldon from TechCrunch


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The Game Developers Conference concludes today in San Francisco but that doesn’t mean our coverage is over.

TechCrunch writer Lucas Matney and Extra Crunch contributor Eric Peckham were at the Moscone Center and got a first-hand glimpse into what is coming up for gamers and developers alike. And at noon PT today they’ll be sharing what they saw with Extra Crunch members on a conference call.

First, there can be no discussion about gaming news this week without mentioning Google’s new game-streaming service Stadia. As Lucas wrote this week, the service will let gamers leave their hefty GPUs and expensive systems behind … and the service can be used on devices with a Chrome browser and an internet connection.

They’ll also be discussing the latest about game engines, VR and voice-based gaming.

To listen to the call and the opportunity to participate in future conference calls, become a member of

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Crunchyroll raises its monthly subscription price to $7.99


This post is by Anthony Ha from TechCrunch


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Crunchyroll is announcing its first major price increase since the anime streaming service launched in 2006.

Prices for its premium subscription will go up in the United States, Great Britain, Australia and the Nordics — in the U.S. and Australia, the monthly price will increase from $6.95 to $7.99 (or $79.99 per year), while British subscribers will see their bill go up from £4.99 to £6.50 (or £64.99 per year).

You don’t need to pay to watch Crunchyroll content, but a subscription gives you access to an ad-free experience, simulcasts shortly after a program airs in Japan and full access to the Crunchyroll library.

The company says it has 12 million active monthly users and 2 million paying subscribers.

As for why it’s raising prices after so many years, a spokesperson suggested this is a natural part of Crunchyroll’s evolution, as it has

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This Bacon Is Bananas (Peels, That Is)


This post is by Claire Lower on Skillet, shared by Claire Lower to Lifehacker from Lifehacker


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Throughout my efforts to turn scraps into treats, I have encountered some challenges, but none have been as challenging as the dreaded banana peel. Though the fruit portion of the banana is delicious, its natural wrapper is just plain unap-peeling. Chewing on a raw banana peel is an extremely unpleasant experience.…

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