Incredible video shows how Space X plans to land largest rocket in the world


This post is by Dante D'Orazio from The Verge - All Posts


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




You know what’s cooler than a gigantic rocket? A gigantic rocket that can land itself. Elon Musk’s Space X released a new video this week demonstrating just what it plans to do with its upcoming Falcon Heavy rocket, which is set to launch for the first time later this year.

In essence, the rocket is three of the company’s current Falcon 9 rockets strapped together. The result is a rocket that can carry over 115,000 pounds (53,000 kg) — the equivalent of a fully-loaded Boeing 737 passenger jet — to low-earth orbit. When it flies later this year, the Falcon Heavy will be the world’s most powerful rocket. Only the Saturn V rocket, which was retired in 1973 after sending Apollo missions to the moon, was more powerful.

Powerful enough to…

<a href="http://www.theverge.com/2015/2/1/7957585/how-space-x-plans-to-land-largest-rocket-in-the-world">Continue reading&hellip;</a>

4 Super Bowl tech ads to see ahead of the big day


This post is by Ruth Reader from VentureBeat


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Football


The days leading up to the Super Bowl are always fraught with nervous excitement, not only over the game, but the advertisements that accompany it.

Super Bowl ads are a particularly special occasion for tech companies. After all, Apple’s “1984” commercial is credited with instigating the event of creating epic advertisements around the big day. And website builder GoDaddy has continued the tradition by creating controversial advertisements, like this year’s “Journey Home,” which caused such a stir that it’s already been pulled.

In anticipation of tomorrow’s festivities (and fiascos), we put together a list of our favorite 2015 tech company Super Bowl ads — at least so far. We’re excited to see what else gets served up tomorrow. In the mean time, enjoy.

Mophie

We dug the apocalyptic vibe of on-the-go mobile phone charger Mophie’s 2015 Super Bowl commercial.

Squarespace

Website builder Squarespace, will feature Jeff Bridges soothing voice for its upcoming ad. In addition to the Jeff Bridges ad, Squarespace also made an ad called “A Better Web” that’s worth checking out. Here’s a teaser of Jeff Bridges.

Wix.com

Wix.

Continue reading “4 Super Bowl tech ads to see ahead of the big day”

Hockey And Big Data


This post is by Nick Rojas,John Siegel from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




hockey-data Hockey is a naturally aggressive sport, and the casual fan has learned to associate it with violence, the kind that makes the daily sports highlight segment on the news. But like other sports, there are subtle nuances to the game that are lost in between the bare-knuckle brawls and bone-jarring hits. Hockey is the ultimate team sport in the regard that players are more than willing to… Read More

How to build a world-saving startup


This post is by Rob Wu, CauseVox from VentureBeat


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




save the world


Here’s a depressing fact — most startups fail. That’s not just for web startups, but all startup businesses of any kind.

If you’re a do-gooder, it’s even harder.

Social good startups have the odds stacked against them. Most companies focus specifically on the bottom line, but social good startups are dealing with two measures of success: financial and social impact.

Why does doing good and doing well have to be so hard?

It may be challenging, but there have been many social good startups that have succeeded including prominent companies like Tom’s and Warby Parker. I started CauseVox, a nonprofit crowdfunding platform, with nothing more than a dream and now we have grown it to serving thousands of charities all over the world, including the American Red Cross.

Here’s what we learned that can help you launch your own social good startup.

Remember, you are creating a business

As a social good startup, you’re looking to make the world a better place. Helping people is fun and intrinsically rewarding, but you also need to find a scalable business model.

The first step in creating the right model is to ask:

How to build a world-saving startup


This post is by Rob Wu, CauseVox from VentureBeat


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




save the world


Here’s a depressing fact — most startups fail. That’s not just for web startups, but all startup businesses of any kind.

If you’re a do-gooder, it’s even harder.

Social good startups have the odds stacked against them. Most companies focus specifically on the bottom line, but social good startups are dealing with two measures of success: financial and social impact.

Why does doing good and doing well have to be so hard?

It may be challenging, but there have been many social good startups that have succeeded including prominent companies like Tom’s and Warby Parker. I started CauseVox, a nonprofit crowdfunding platform, with nothing more than a dream and now we have grown it to serving thousands of charities all over the world, including the American Red Cross.

Here’s what we learned that can help you launch your own social good startup.

Remember, you are creating a business

As a social good startup, you’re looking to make the world a better place. Helping people is fun and intrinsically rewarding, but you also need to find a scalable business model.

The first step in creating the right model is to ask:

Drones need software, too


This post is by Brian Feinstein, Bessemer Venture Partners from VentureBeat


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Drone Maurizio Pesce Flickr


Venture capitalists aren’t seers. But at Bessemer Venture Partners, we try to dive deep into a particular sector to find great investments. The thinking is that by thoroughly getting to know the pain points — and players — in a particular sector, we can identify trends and predict opportunities for investment. And, in turn, we will be better equipped to identify and support the next generation of transformative companies.

With that in mind, here are a few of our best guesses about industry-specific areas ripe for innovation — some of which are already starting to be explored, and some that are still untapped:

Mobile-centric industry applications

Enterprise software historically catered only to people at their desks. But today’s mobile apps can make a field worker’s day far more productive, freeing up hours that would otherwise be spent physically filling out forms and pushing paperwork. By addressing industry-specific workflows, mobile solutions create better collaboration and communication. This seems obvious — until you come across an industry untouched by technology.

Commercial real estate was one such category. Brokers worked in the field, but returned to their desks to print tenant reports, enter deal updates, and share materials. Now, those common tasks are easily completed from the field using a mobile app from Hightower that enables landlords and brokers to quickly input and share transaction data.

Data entry challenges don’t just affect the real estate world, though. These sorts of slowdowns impact everything from hotels (housekeeping) to transportation (repair logs) to restaurants (food inspections) and local governments (work orders to fix potholes). And each of these industries is a prospective growth field.

Enterprise software for emerging hardware platforms

The emergence of a new hardware platform always prompts an era of profound opportunity for software makers building applications for it.

Continue reading “Drones need software, too”

The Verge Playlist: Future Jock Jams


This post is by Lizzie Plaugic from The Verge - All Posts


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




At some point on Sunday, if you’re watching the Super Bowl, you’ll hear a familiar sound. Not the sound of a referee making a bad call, or the sound of an abandoned hot dog falling to the floor, or the sound of half-drunk fans growling at other half-drunk fans. No, I’m talking about the sound of jock jams; the only sound capable of satisfying an entire stadium of aggressively competitive people with a lot of money. There’s “Tootsie Roll,” “Pump Up The Jam,” “It Takes Two.” Even if you haven’t listened to those songs in years, I bet you can hear them in your head right now if you try.

Inspired by the mid-90s compilation tapes of the same name, I’ve put together a playlist of “Future Jock Jams.” Not songs that will be jock jams in the…

<a href="http://www.theverge.com/2015/1/31/7953189/the-verge-playlist-future-jock-jams">Continue reading&hellip;</a>

Building data science teams: The power of the technology stack


This post is by Rodrigo Rivera, Rocket Internet from VentureBeat


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




technology stack


A factor that is frequently overlooked when setting up a data team is the selection of the technology stack. Often, this decision is delegated to the first hire in data science. Due to a lack of information about the right technologies, those in charge avoid making a decision. There is a case to be made for building a multilingual team. Nevertheless, I would like to highlight the advantages of choosing a technology stack during the conceptualization of a data team.

Hiring

More often than not, Internet companies looking for a data scientist phrase their current job openings like this: “Expert knowledge of an analysis tool such as R, Matlab, or SAS and ability to write efficient code in at least one language (preferably Java, C++, Python, or Perl).” The problem here is that these are seven different skills for very different use cases. As a consequence, the company receives a huge variety of profiles and this does not help to ease the selection process at all.

It is important to distinguish between using exotic and sexy technologies to attract top talent and the tools that will be actually used for the day-to-day job. Therefore, it is possible to search for a data scientist who is proficient in Java and Scala but who will have the opportunity to work with Clojure. All three languages are part of the Java Virtual Machine, they are used extensively in the data science world, and they complement each other. The team might actually only use Scala, but Clojure is used as bait to lure top candidates. Other popular choices here are the languages Julia and Haskell. However, be careful not to overuse the strategy of picking popular choices just to get good candidates. The company should ask itself which technologies and programming languages it can and wants to support. For example, other teams might already be working with certain languages for other tasks and it may be possible to do knowledge sharing.

Additionally, the company should analyze the realities of the job market.

Continue reading “Building data science teams: The power of the technology stack”

How Connected Cars Have Established A New Ecosystem Powered By IoT


This post is by Jahangir Mohammed from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




connectedcar Not long ago, after you bought a new vehicle, the manufacturer had very little contact with you for years until it was time to sell you another car. The Internet of Things is changing all that. The IoT-enabled “connected car” turns the vehicle itself into a hub for an entire ecosystem of connected services that offer consumers a wealth of benefits including enhanced safety and… Read More

Snapchat’s first episode of Literally Can’t Even is a train wreck — and that’s not a bad thing


This post is by Ruth Reader from VentureBeat


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Emily Goldwyn, Sasha Spielberg and Rylee Ebsen


The first episode of Snapchat’s new micro-series Literally Can’t Even, debuted this morning on the app’s new Discover media channel. While some may think the opening episode was “dumb,” there may be more promise in the series than meets the eye.

The show opens on two girls, Sasha and Emily, sitting in a car outside of a pool party debating whether to go in. Emily, played by Emily Goldwyn, is about to begin a cleanse — meaning no drinking for her. She complains to Sasha that she doesn’t think this is the right environment for her to kick off her sobriety.

“Exposure therapy, is the only kind of therapy,” replies Sasha, played by Sasha Spielberg. The newly single Sasha is more worried about the guy she’ll be meeting at this party.

The show is composed in a comic book-style series of windows, that highlight various angles of the scene in a way that’s easy to watch on a mobile phone held vertically. The show oscillates between one large frame and screen splits, but not in a way that’s jarring.

The three minute show follows the girls as they try to survive this epic pool party, called ‘Sip & Surf XXX.” Upon walking into the pool area, the girls are shot at with a super-soaker water gun. The shooter, a tanned guy with rippling muscles, reveals himself as Xavier (pronounced Ja-Vee-eh) — Sasha’s potential love interest.

“Sick bod. Both of you guys actually. They’re different, but you’re both hot,” he says.

Continue reading “Snapchat’s first episode of Literally Can’t Even is a train wreck — and that’s not a bad thing”

Gorillaz announces its return with new artwork on Instagram


This post is by Dante D'Orazio from The Verge - All Posts


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Everyone’s favorite cartoon band is getting back together. Gorillaz co-founder Jamie Hewlett excited fans on Thursday when he posted new artwork of band members Murdoc and Noodle on Instagram. Hewlett later confirmed that the band was getting back together with a simple reply to one of the Instagram posts: “Yes, Gorillaz returns.”

#Murdoc

A photo posted by hewll (@hewll) on

There has yet to be an official announcement, but it’s expected that the band — together with Gorillaz co-creator Damon Albarn — will release a new album sometime this year. Its fifth album, The Fall, came out in 2011. Following that release, the band went on hiatus, though disagreements between Albarn and Hewlett are…

<a href="http://www.theverge.com/2015/1/31/7957163/gorillaz-reunites-with-new-cartoons">Continue reading&hellip;</a>

Why some of tech’s greatest minds are still missing the Internet of Things picture


This post is by Narbeh Derhacobian, Adesto from VentureBeat


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Puzzle pieces


I did not attend the annual Consumer Electronics Show two weeks ago, but I eagerly read about the prototypes for new consumer gadgets and services that debuted there. From all accounts, the Internet of Things was a major theme of the show. Yet, to my dismay, the coverage I saw coming out of the event was decidedly ambivalent, even dismissive, when it came to the potential of the Internet of Things.

How can this be? The Internet of Things (IoT) has been heralded far and wide as the next great revolution in technology. Gartner is predicting that the Internet of Things will include 26 billion connected devices by 2020, and Cisco forecasts $19 trillion in economic value over the next decade. Yet when top tech companies put their most exciting ideas for IoT devices in front of the savviest tech writers and consumers, the reaction is lukewarm.

Many examples I came across about were admittedly underwhelming. I keep reading that a smart fridge will tell me when I’m out of milk. One widely cited product was a $99 connected toothbrush. Other favorite examples included smart coffee pots, plant waterers, and even a belt. The verdicts on these products ranged from skeptical to dismissive, to nearly angry.

Before we write off IoT, let’s remember how many successful technology trends have produced some … interesting concepts. In the late ’90s, portable technology was all the buzz. And before the iPod brought together the technology, product, services, and price point in a way that consumers loved, there were products like the MiniDisc, the Universal Media Disc, or (best example from my staff) Clip Hits. Let’s not also forget that the early days of the mobile revolution produced some remarkably bad phones. The 3D craze made it into televisions, and at one point someone thought Bluetooth sunglasses were a good idea.

Continue reading “Why some of tech’s greatest minds are still missing the Internet of Things picture”