Token Summit IV


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


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Chris Burniske reminded me yesterday of something I said a while ago:

We are in the post crash cycle in crypto and that has made the sector interesting to me again. Prices are way down and there is a lot of great work being done on projects we are invested in and projects we want to invest in.

And no better place to soak up all of that progress than at Token Summit IV, run by our friends William Mougayar and Nick Tomainoon May 16th in NYC.

When William asked me if I thought they should do it this year, I

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Why your attention is like a piece of contested territory


This post is by Ben Lorica from All - O'Reilly Media


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The O’Reilly Data Show Podcast: P.W. Singer on how social media has changed, war, politics, and business.

In this episode of the Data Show, I spoke with P.W. Singer, strategist and senior fellow at the New America Foundation, and a contributing editor at Popular Science. He is co-author of an excellent new book, LikeWar: The Weaponization of Social Media, which explores how social media has changed war, politics, and business. The book is essential reading for anyone interested in how social media has become an important new battlefield in a diverse set of domains and settings.

Continue reading Why your attention is like a piece of contested territory.

You created a machine learning application. Now make sure it’s secure.


This post is by Ben Lorica, Mike Loukides from All - O'Reilly Media


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The software industry has demonstrated, all too clearly, what happens when you don’t pay attention to security.

In a recent post, we described what it would take to build a sustainable machine learning practice. By “sustainable,” we mean projects that aren’t just proofs of concepts or experiments. A sustainable practice means projects that are integral to an organization’s mission: projects by which an organization lives or dies. These projects are built and supported by a stable team of engineers, and supported by a management team that understands what machine learning is, why it’s important, and what it’s capable of accomplishing. Finally, sustainable machine learning means that as many aspects of product development as possible are automated: not just building models, but cleaning data, building and managing data pipelines, testing, and much more. Machine learning will penetrate our organizations so deeply that it won’t be possible for humans to manage

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Four short links: 28 February 2019


This post is by Nat Torkington from All - O'Reilly Media


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Breakthrough Technologies, AI Habitat, Simplified Datomic, and Metrics

  1. Breakthrough Technologies 2019 (MIT TR) — robot dexterity, new-wave nuclear power, predicting preemies, gut probe in a pill, custom cancer vaccines, the cow-free burger, CO2 catcher, ECG on your wrist, sanitation without sewers, AI assistants.
  2. AI Habitat (Facebook) — enables training of embodied AI agents (virtual robots) in a highly photorealistic & efficient 3D simulator, before transferring the learned skills to reality.
  3. AsamiIn-memory graph store that implements the Naga storage protocol. This has a query API that looks very similar to a simplified Datomic.
  4. MetricsMetrics are lossily compressed logs. Traces are logs with parent child relationships between entries. The only reason we have three terms is because getting value from them has required different compromises to make them cost effective. –Clint Sharp. (via Simon Willison)

Continue reading Four short links: 28 February 2019.

5 Ways Technology is Transforming the Healthcare Industry


This post is by Iman Ghosh from Technology – Visual Capitalist


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




5 Ways Technology is Transforming the Healthcare Industry

5 Ways Tech is Transforming the Healthcare Industry

Whether it’s information-sharing between patients and doctors or aiding in a high-risk surgery, it’s clear that dynamic applications of technology are well underway in disrupting the healthcare industry.

TECH AT OUR FINGERTIPS

Today’s infographic from the Online Medical Care highlights healthcare areas where tech is breaking barriers. Here are five ways that technology is impacting the sector, ranging from AI to nanomedicine:

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence will have a dramatic impact on many industries, and healthcare is no exception.

A large share of healthcare executives are already applying artificial intelligence in their operations, with data showing plans to increase budgets last year.

Healthcare uses of AI Adoption (2017) Adoption (2018E)
Clinical decision support 46% 59%
Population health 33% 46%
Disease management 29% 42%
Re-admissions 33% 41%
Medical costs / health plan 21% 38%
Patient safety and quality 25% 33%
Supply chain

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Carbon-Offset Shipping On Etsy


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


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I don’t write a lot about Etsy here at AVC. It is a public company and I am the Chairman so I have to be careful.

But today Etsy is announcing something that makes me so proud. I have to tell you about it. Etsy is the first major online shopping destination to offset 100% of carbon emissions from shipping.

Here is Etsy CEO Josh Silverman’s blog post on this news.

Etsy has been committed to clean energy for a long time. They will power 100% of their operations with renewable energy by next year. But the company understood that they could not stop there and needed to think about the carbon footprint of their network of sellers shipping products to buyers. And so they have taken the next step of offsetting all of the carbon emissions related to shipping on Etsy. This initiative comes at no additional cost to

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Four short links: 27 February 2019


This post is by Nat Torkington from All - O'Reilly Media


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Universal Binaries, Front-End Training, ML Myths, and Recommended Books

  1. WASMerUniversal Binaries Powered by WebAssembly. (open source)
  2. Frontend Workshop from HTML/CSS/JS to TypeScript/React/Redux — Microsoft’s training materials. Open sourced.
  3. Myths in Machine LearningTensorFlow is a Tensor manipulation library; Image datasets are representative of real images found in the wild; Machine Learning researchers do not use the test set for validation; Every datapoint is used in training a neural network; We need (batch) normalization to train very deep residual networks; Attention > Convolution; Saliency maps are robust ways to interpret neural networks.
  4. Books I Recommend (Jessie Frazelle) — tight set of recommendations that overlap enough with my own reading that I’m already ordering the books that are new to me.

Continue reading Four short links: 27 February 2019.

Nostalgia Internet doesn’t really matter


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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Nostalgia has come to the Internet, and it is too little, too late. Nostalgia is not what defines the future. Sub-10 year-olds won’t give a damn about the nostalgia-Internet. Unfortunately, that is why we see incumbents always miss the generational drift. Sure, I might use analog film, write with fountain pens and listen to long play records, but it doesn’t matter to the young ones in my family. They know what they are doing, even though still in early teens. And when my goddaughters grow up in a few years, they will be fully equipped to deal with information overload, influencer dichotomy and would be able to discern fake news. For them, it will be something new, something different. Just like it was for us. Another way to read this story — a certain cohort of Internet people including myself are getting old  (Photo by RawPixel via Unsplash)

How AI and Big Data Will Unlock the Next Wave of Mineral Discoveries


This post is by Nicholas LePan from Technology – Visual Capitalist


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




How AI and Big Data Will Unlock the Next Wave of Mineral Discoveries

How AI and Big Data Will Unlock the Next Mineral Discovery

Emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning are rapidly proving their value across many industries.

Today’s infographic comes from GoldSpot Discoveries, and it shows that when this tech is applied to massive geological data sets, that there is growing potential to unlock the next wave of mineral discoveries.

Mineral Exploration: Fortunes Go to the Few

Discovering new sources of minerals, such as copper, gold, or even cobalt, can be notoriously difficult but also very rewarding. According to Goldspot, the chance of finding a new deposit is around 0.5%, with odds improving to 5% if exploration takes place near a known resource.

On the whole, mineral exploration has not been a winning prospect if you compare the total dollar spend and the actual value of the resulting discoveries.

Measuring Discovery Performance by Region (2005 to

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Progress Is Ugly


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I walked out of my house in LA this morning and was greeted with this sight:

I thought “ugh” and debated picking it up and putting it where it belongs.

I am all for progress and understand that there are costs and benefits with everything.

This post explains how electric scooters can and likely will result in massive reductions in carbon emissions (and that Steve Jobs was a big fan of electric scooters).

With that electricity subtracted, the net amount of mitigated carbon equals 17,130 metric tons. Let’s reduce this number by 20% for people who would have walked and for chargers picking up scooters in their cars. Now we’re looking at a total amount of 13,700 metric tons of CO2 mitigated by not driving a car.That’s the equivalent of taking 105,000 cars off the roads around the world, each day.
https://medium.com/cleantech-rising/the-environmental-impact-of-electric-scooters-8da806939a32

That is a big deal. It

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[02.26.2019] The Daily Noted


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




“We definitely don’t want a society where there’s a camera in everyone’s living room watching the content of those conversations.” Mark Zuckerberg, CEO, Facebook, whose company sells Portal, a smart speaker, that does exactly that. Via

I am kicking off the morning with three works by “A Letter from Om” readers. They had smart things to say and emailed me their links. I felt they deserved a bigger audience. You can judge for yourself.

The Daily Noted is a collection of my thoughts, links worth following Continue reading “[02.26.2019] The Daily Noted”

3 reasons to add deep learning to your time series toolkit


This post is by Francesca Lazzeri from All - O'Reilly Media


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The most promising area in the application of deep learning methods to time series forecasting is in the use of CNNs, LSTMs, and hybrid models.

The ability to accurately forecast a sequence into the future is critical in many industries: finance, supply chain, and manufacturing are just a few examples. Classical time series techniques have served this task for decades, but now deep learning methods—similar to those used in computer vision and automatic translation—have the potential to revolutionize time series forecasting as well.

Due to their applicability to many real-life problems—such as fraud detection, spam email filtering, finance, and medical diagnosis—and their ability to produce actionable results, deep learning neural networks have gained a lot of attention in recent years. Generally, deep learning methods have been developed and applied to univariate time series forecasting scenarios, where the time series consists of single observations recorded sequentially over equal time increments. For

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Four short links: 26 February 2019


This post is by Nat Torkington from All - O'Reilly Media


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Cloud Act, Content Moderation, Conference Diversity, and Exposing Secrets

  1. US Cloud Act (Bloomberg) — nations fight over corporations that are fighting over consumers. A few years ago it was hypothesised that corporations had the advantage in an age of globalisation, but there is still fight left in the nation.
  2. Facebook Content Moderators (The Verge) — a horrific story about the low-paid traumatic work of moderating user-generated content. Now it’s being done domestically (was, and may still be, primarily in Philippines), but with little concern to the damage done by watching murders and rapes every day. When I ask about the risks of contractors developing PTSD, a counselor I’ll call Logan tells me about a different psychological phenomenon: “post-traumatic growth,” an effect whereby some trauma victims emerge from the experience feeling stronger than before. The example he gives me is that of Malala Yousafzai, the women’s education activist, who was shot

    Continue reading “Four short links: 26 February 2019”

Animation: The Top 15 Global Brands (2000-2018)


This post is by Jeff Desjardins from Technology – Visual Capitalist


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Animation: The Top 15 Global Brands (2000-2018)

Time travel back to the early-2000s, and a list of the world’s most respected brands might be surprising.

Tobacco company Marlboro is still one of the top 15 global brands with a value of $22 billion, while companies like Nokia and AT&T also help to round out the group.

Aside from Microsoft, the tech companies at the time were mostly focused on hardware and services. HP was considered a top global brand at the time, and even IBM was still making PCs until the year 2005.

The Platform Revolution

How times have changed.

In today’s animation from TheRankings, you can see how the list of the top 15 global brands has evolved over the last two decades or so.

The visible shift: as soon as Google hits the rankings in 2008 (2:21 in video), it becomes clear that the money is on

Top 15 Global Brands in 2018
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How To Be A Good Board Member


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Mark Suster wrote a post this weekend laying out some rules for being a good board member before the meeting, in the meeting, and outside of the meeting. It is a very good list. I particularly like his rules for outside of the board meeting and agree with him that is the most important part of being a board member.

I try to follow these rules except “let others speak.” That is a joke but I am known for taking up a lot of airtime in meetings, not only board meetings. It is something I’ve been working on for thirty-five years and something I expect I will be working on for the rest of my life. I just get so into it and can’t help myself.

Which leads me to my rule for being a good board member.

It comes down to one word.

Care.

If you care, really

Continue reading “How To Be A Good Board Member”

Four short links: 25 February 2019


This post is by Nat Torkington from All - O'Reilly Media


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Generalising, Combining, Deciding, and Working.

  1. Learning to Generalize from Sparse and Underspecified Rewards (Google) — where an agent receives a complex input, such as a natural language instruction, and needs to generate a complex response, such as an action sequence, while only receiving binary success-failure feedback. Such success-failure rewards are often underspecified: they do not distinguish between purposeful and accidental success. Generalization from underspecified rewards hinges on discounting spurious trajectories that attain accidental success, while learning from sparse feedback requires effective exploration. […] The MeRL approach outperforms our alternative reward learning technique based on Bayesian Optimization, and achieves the state-of-the-art on weakly-supervised semantic parsing. It improves previous work by 1.2% and 2.4% on WikiTableQuestions and WikiSQL datasets respectively. An important area of machine learning because most successes and failures don’t come with a root cause analysis.
  2. Generating CombinationsGosper’s Hack is a very elegant piece of

    Continue reading “Four short links: 25 February 2019”

This is what a foldable phone case looks like


This post is by Brian Heater from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Foldable phones are having their moments at this year’s Mobile World Congress. A few days after Samsung debuted the Galaxy Fold on stage at an event in San Francisco, Huawei has just shown off its solution, the Mate X.

On the face of it, the device looks like it may well be a step up from the Galaxy device, right down to its three large screens. Of course, all of that display real estate presents some key new challenges, beyond the underlying technology. Namely, how to avoid getting those surfaces scratched to hell.

Huawei’s got a solution for that, too — albeit not quite as elegant as the phone itself. In one of the earliest examples we’ve seen indicating what foldable cases may look like, going forward, the company quickly showed up a slip case.

The accessory opens to accept the folded up phone, snapping shut to protect both sides

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Huawei unveils its 5G consumer solutions built on new 5G chipset


This post is by Matt Burns from TechCrunch


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Today at MWC Barcalona Huawei launched its first consumer 5G products. Aside from its 5G Mate 20 X, the company also updated and new products that will bring 5G to people’s homes and devices through routers and connectivity options. Most consumers will first taste 5G not on a dedicated device like a phone, but through broadband-like services and these devices are aimed at that market.

Last year, Huawei announced the 5G CPE Pro but never took it to market. Then, last month, ahead of MWC Barcelona, Huawei announced a new version alongside its new Balong 5000 5G chipset, which is at the heart of its consumer 5G products.

Huawei’s Balong 5000 brings added connectivity options over the company’s previous 5G chipsets. Huawei claims the Balong 5000 is the first chip that supports both standalone (SA) and non-standalone (NSA) network architectures for 5G allowing it connect to existing supercharged 4G

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The “Doubling Model” For Fundraising


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


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I was talking to a friend this past week who is looking at an early stage company and trying to figure out how to value it.

He pointed to a similar company that has a public market cap of $250mm.

I asked him how many rounds of financing or how many major milestones does this early stage business need to accomplish before it can get to the same place the similar publicly traded company is at.

He said he thought it was going to take three big steps after this financing to get there.

So I said, “it is worth roughly $30mm after this round.”

He said “how did you determine that?”

I said “If you assume the value will double from round to round or milestone to milestone, and after three more of those it will be worth $250mm, then it should be worth $30mm after this

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Huawei is bringing 5G to the Mate 20 X


This post is by Matt Burns from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Today at MWC Barcelona Huawei announced it will bring 5G to its flagship phone, the Mate 20 X. This marks the first 5G phone from the Chinese mobile giant. Huawei joins a growing list of companies introducing their first 5G phone in early 2019.

In the past week, Samsung, Oppo, and Xiaomi announced 5G versions of their flagship phones.

The company failed revealed any more details about the upcoming handset including price and availability. Chances are the Mate 20 X will feature a version of its do-it-all Balong 5000 chipset, the company’s latest 5G chip announced a few weeks ago.

Huawei’s Balong 5000 brings added connectivity options over the company’s previous 5G chipsets. Huawei claims the Balong 5000 is the first chip that supports both standalone (SA) and non-standalone (NSA) network architectures for 5G allowing it connect to existing supercharged 4G networks as well as future 5G networks.

Continue reading “Huawei is bringing 5G to the Mate 20 X”