Opting Out Of The Legacy Model


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When you look at industries that continue to operate on old, outdated, and highly regulated models (education, health care, banking, brokerage, etc, etc), it is interesting to look at the numbers of consumers who are opting out of the legacy model.

In K12 education, many people think of charter schools as the disruptive model and there are something like 3.5mm to 4mm students attending charter schools in the US now (out of roughly 55mm K12 students in the US: 50mm public, 5mm private).

But if you really want to look at where the disruptive models exist, you need to look at consumers who are completely opting out and in K12 education, that is the homeschooling movement.

My partner Andy sent around this tweet this morning and it is quite interesting:

The Upside And The Downside


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




As I wrote in yesterday’s post, there are good and bad things that come from new technology and new innovations.

The challenge for many of us is that the promoters of the technology only want to talk about the upside. And often the media responds by focusing on the downside. It is hard to find a balanced take on things.

Let’s take this Bloomberg article on ISAs in which students trade a percentage of future earnings to fund tuition. The headline is “College Grads Sell Stakes in Themselves to Wall Street.” Which of course, is the negative narrative on this innovation in financing education.

As my colleague Nick pointed out to me this morning, “the stories often seem to ignore the reverse: how hard it can be to carry a large amount of debt, which is the situation that the vast majority of student loan holders find themselves

Continue reading “The Upside And The Downside”

Facial Recognition


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I would like to start this post with a disclosure. USV portfolio company Clarifai has one of the best facial recognition models on the market and is very active in the facial recognition market. Now that I have disclosed that, we can move on.

Facial recognition has come of age. Machines can figure out who we are and more.

One of the most popular booths with students at The Annual CS Fair this year was the Microsoft booth where they were showing some of their facial recognition technology.

The delight and amazement on the students’ faces was infectious.

But of course, not everyone is excited about facial recognition technology being deployed in the market.

I particularly like that question in the embedded image in that tweet:

How does Jet Blue know what I look like?

The answer turns out

Continue reading “Facial Recognition”

Video Of The Week: John von Neumann on K12 CS Education


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




As many of you know, I have spent a fair bit of my time over the last ten years on increasing the amount of CS Education in our K12 system in NYC and around the US.

My friend Rob sent me this short (2 1/2 min) clip of John von Neumann in the early 50s talking about how important CS Education and in particular K12 CS Education would be.

We largely ignored his advice for the last sixty years but I am optimistic that we are finally heeding it.

A Hackathon At NYC’s City Hall


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I like going to hackathons. A number of USV portfolio companies have emerged out of hackathons, like our portfolio company Dapper which created its hit crypto-collectible game CryptoKitties at a Hackathon in late 2017.

So yesterday I headed down to NYC’s City Hall which was hosting the finals of a citywide hackathon competition (called The Hack League) among NYC schools to create the best software applications to make the city better.

The final projects were judged by people like the Chief Policy and Data Office (Comptroller’s office); the Chief Analytics Officer (City of NY); the Chief Technology Officer (Mayor’s office); the Executive Director of NYC311 (City of NY) and other folks in city government tasked with a similar mandate.

There were 28 finalist teams at City Hall yesterday competing to win the trophy. They were from all five boroughs, representing schools from all kinds of neighborhoods. It was as

Continue reading “A Hackathon At NYC’s City Hall”

Healthcare At USV


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Over the last five years, we have stepped up our investing in and around healthcare. About 15-20% of the early stage companies we have invested in over our last two fund cycles are working in this sector.

If you look at our current investment thesis at USV, you will see that wellness is one of the key areas of interest for us:

USV backs trusted brands that broaden access to knowledge, capital, and well-being by leveraging networks, platforms, and protocols.

So where in the healthcare sector are we focused?

Rebecca tweeted this out yesterday and I think it is a good articulation of what we find most interesting in healthcare:

Underground Infrastructure


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




One evening last week my daughter and I spent an hour with a team from our portfolio company Pilot Fiber who were pulling a new fiber cable from Sixth Avenue to Fifth Avenue along a cross street is in lower Manhattan.

My daughter is doing a project and wanted to understand how this all worked and I was curious myself. It was fascinating.

We met them at a manhole near Sixth Avenue where they had pulled a fiber cable into a building where one of their large customers is based.

The team uses a thin line of “mule tape” that is placed in the conduit between the manhole and the building to pull the fiber cable from the manhole to the building. Ideally the mule tape stays in the conduit so that the next team that needs to run fiber from one manhole to another or into a

Continue reading “Underground Infrastructure”

More S1 Fun


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I am continuing my mini series on reading S1s (IPO documents). We are enjoying an IPO bonanza this year, so we might as well use it for some good and learn something.

When a company files for an IPO, I like to think if there is a publicly traded company that looks a lot like that company and if so, I lik to run some numbers comparing the two.

Well we have that exact situation with Uber filing to go public last week. Here is Uber’s S1.

We can compare Uber’s numbers to recently public Lyft, which I blogged about earlier in this S1 Fun series.

Here are Uber’s profit and loss numbers from their S1:

We can compare this to Lyft’s profit and loss from my prior blog post:

I put all of these numbers into a spreadsheet and added some estimates for 2019 that are nothing more than

Continue reading “More S1 Fun”

Functionality Vs Content


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I saw some chatter on Twitter this past week about Netflix and Disney in the wake of Disney’s announcement of Disney+:

Disney’s stock was up 11% on the week

And Netflix stock was down 5% on the week

Certainly getting into the streaming game will be good for Disney. But I am less sure that content matters that much when it comes to Netflix.

A friend of mine shared this with me earlier this week:

When I saw that data, I replied to him with this:

It is the frustrations of the prior model (interruptive advertising, by appointment consumption, etc) that open the opportunity for the next model

Given that the new model, streaming, is well entrenched now, I am not saying

Continue reading “Functionality Vs Content”

Audio Of The Week: Coinbase Custody


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




And now a word from your sponsor:

Coinbase is a USV portfolio company, I am on the board, and I am deeply invested in this business.

Coinbase’s regulated custody subsidiary is an important part of their overall business and I am also on the board of it.

This Unconfirmed Podcast with Sam McIngvale is a really good explanation of what Coinbase is doing in the custody market and how they are developing new income earning options for their customers.

A Registered Token Offering


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Our portfolio company Blockstack tweeted out this today:

Given that USV is an investor and one of my partners is on the board, I don’t want to opine on this in any way.

But I do think this is an interesting development in the evolution of tokens as investable assets.

So here is a Coindesk post on this news.

Dronebase Goes Thermal


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Our portfolio company Dronebase is announcing some big news today.

They are going to be offering thermal imaging missions in partnership with FLIR, the leading provider of thermal sensors. And FLIR has made a strategic investment in Dronebase.

What is thermal imaging? Thermal imagery, which is also called infrared imagery, is the ability to see a much larger portion of the electromagnetic spectrum than what is visible to the eye. This page from FLIR’s website does a good job of explaining the technology.

If you put a FLIR thermal sensor on a drone, you can learn a lot more about buildings, equipment, terrain, etc, etc. The military sector has been doing this for years and the commercial sector is starting to use the technology a lot now too.

Here is an image of a roof captured with a traditional drone camera:

And here is an image of a roof

Continue reading “Dronebase Goes Thermal”

Get Your Message On Mobile


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I finally got around to reading the Political Advertising Report from Tech For Campaigns. My conclusion is we are going to see our phones light up with political messages over the next year and a half. Here is why:

Only Trump spent a percentage of total spend on digital that is close to what companies do
When you buy Facebook ads, you are buying mobile ads
The older you are the more likely that you click on ads on your phone

So let’s brace ourselves for the messages that are going to start coming into our phones from politicians over the next 18 months. Mobile advertising works.

I am closing comments to this post because I don’t want to turn this blog’s comments into a soapbox for certain people and we all know who they are.

Scaling A Company While Controlling Costs


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Over the last decade, the costs of scaling a company in the bay area, NYC, and many other startup regions in the US has escalated sharply. We have encouraged our portfolio companies that are located in these high cost regions to build out secondary locations where they can hire high quality engineering and other talent at lower costs. Locations in North America that have been attractive to our portfolio companies are cities like Des Moines, Indianapolis, Toronto, and a number of others.

Another approach that has worked well for our portfolio companies is to have a secondary location outside of the US, where talent can be hired a much lower cost than the US.

So it was with interest that I read this in Zoom’s IPO prospectus;

we have a high concentration of research and development personnel in China

It turns out that Zoom has most of its engineering

Continue reading “Scaling A Company While Controlling Costs”

The Heartbeat (Continued)


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I wrote a post last year called The Heartbeat in which I advocated for a cadence and a rhythm in an organization.

I was reminded of that in this exchange on Twitter over the last 24 hours:

Many of USV’s portfolio companies use an OKR process to create this rhythm in their teams. What I have learned from watching these companies and listening to how the teams talk about the OKR process is that to some extent it is “form over substance” in that the process is ultimately more important than the specific objectives and key results that flow through the process.

I am not saying that teams shouldn’t be thoughtful in setting objectives and committed to hitting them. They should.

But I am saying that the regular setting of objectives (quarterly is a

Continue reading “The Heartbeat (Continued)”

Video Of The Week: AI and Society


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Earlier this week, Kara Swisher interviewed Kate Crawford and Meredith Whittaker, who run NYU’s AI Now Institute.

It is an interesting and thought provoking discussion. I don’t personally love Kate and Meredith’s answers on how society should be thinking about these issues. They feel very “20th century” to me.

But regardless of what you think about their particular take on the issues, I do think we all ought to be paying a lot of attention to AI and its impact on and role in our society. It is important.

Funding Friday: Code Society


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Code Society is like Schoolhouse Rock for Computer Science. They use hip hop music and videos to teach computer science concepts to diverse communities.

They are doing a $40k project on Kickstarter (and are about half way there) to create content and applications. I backed it earlier this week and you can back it here.

Orthodoxy


This post is by Fred Wilson from AVC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I am not a fan of Orthodoxy.

I appreciate the power of religion although I am not religious personally. I respect the followers of Allah, Jesus, Moses, Buddha, and other religious figures. I know that the beliefs of religious people give them great comfort and a purpose in life.

What I don’t appreciate is when a person of faith believes so deeply that they cannot tolerate beliefs that are different from theirs. I call this Orthodoxy and it has led to wars, horrible crimes, and many other bad things. It is the downside of what is and should be a very positive thing for humanity.

We see this same behavior developing in the cryto sector. Bitcoin and other cryptoassets have become a belief system. That is at the core of their value. Why would I give you $5000 of my dollars for one of your Bitcoin? Because I believe in

Continue reading “Orthodoxy”