Four short links: 23 April 2019


This post is by Nat Torkington from All - O'Reilly Media


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Worker-run Gig Factories, Persistence of Firefighting, Discriminating Systems, and Activation Atlas

  1. When Workers Control the Code (Wired) — workers form co-ops to code and run gig economy apps, and make decent rates because there’s no rent-seeker platform in the middle. A great counter for rising prices and plummeting driver pay post-IPO. (via BoingBoing)
  2. The Persistence of Firefighting in Product DevelopmentThe most important result of our studies is that product development systems have a tipping point. In models of infectious diseases, the tipping point represents the threshold of infectivity and susceptibility beyond which a disease becomes an epidemic. Similarly, in product development systems there exists a threshold for problem-solving activity that, when crossed, causes firefighting to spread rapidly from a few isolated projects to the entire development system. Our analysis also shows that the location of the tipping point, and therefore the susceptibility of the system to the

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Four short links: 22 April 2019


This post is by Nat Torkington from All - O'Reilly Media


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GANs via Spreadsheet, Open Source Chat, Sandboxing Libraries, and Flat Robot Sales

  1. SpacesheetInteractive Latent Space Exploration through a Spreadsheet Interface. (via Flowing Data)
  2. Tchap — the French government’s open source secure encrypted chat tool, built off the open source Riot. (via ZDNet)
  3. Sandboxed API — Google open-sourced their tool for automatically generating sandboxes for C/C++ libraries. (via Google Blog)
  4. Industrial Robot Sales Flat (Robohub) — It was only up 1% over 2017. Important note: No information was given about service and field robotics. (which may well be booming)

Continue reading Four short links: 22 April 2019.

Four short links: 19 April 2019


This post is by Nat Torkington from All - O'Reilly Media


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AI Music, Mind-Controlled Robot Hands, Uber’s Repo Tools, and Career Resilience

  1. AI and Music (The Verge) — total legal clusterf*ck.
  2. A Robot Hand Controlled with the Mind — student uses open source hand and trains brain-machine interface, and holy crap we live in an age when these kinds of things are relatively easy to do rather than requiring massive resources.
  3. Keeping Master GreenThis paper presents the design and implementation of SubmitQueue. It guarantees an always green master branch at scale: all build steps (e.g., compilation, unit tests, UI tests) successfully execute for every commit point. SubmitQueue has been in production for over a year and can scale to thousands of daily commits to giant monolithic repositories. Uber’s tech. (via Adrian Colyer)
  4. Early Career Setback and Future Career ImpactOur analyses reveal that an early-career near miss has powerful, opposing effects. On one hand, it

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Four short links: 18 April 2019


This post is by Nat Torkington from All - O'Reilly Media


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Geospatial Feature Engineering, 3D Reconstruction, Fast NLP, and Learning the Zork Interpreter Language

  1. Geomancera geospatial feature engineering library. It leverages geospatial data such as OpenStreetMap (OSM) alongside a data warehouse like BigQuery. You can use this to create, share, and iterate geospatial features for your downstream tasks (analysis, modeling, visualization, etc.).
  2. Meshrooma free, open source 3D Reconstruction Software based on the AliceVision framework.
  3. BlingFireA lightning fast finite state machine and regular expression manipulation library. […] We use Fire for many linguistic operations inside Bing such as tokenization, multi-word expression matching, unknown word-guessing, stemming / lemmatization, just to mention a few. cf NLTK.
  4. Learning ZIL — what the Infocom games were written in, decades before Inform. Andrew Plotkin wrote an intro that explains how it sits in the universe. (Note: this is useless but historically interesting.)

Continue reading Four short links: 18 April 2019.

Highlights from the O’Reilly Artificial Intelligence Conference in New York 2019


This post is by Mac Slocum from All - O'Reilly Media


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Watch highlights from expert talks covering AI, machine learning, deep learning, ethics, and more.

People from across the AI world came together in New York for the O’Reilly Artificial Intelligence Conference. Below you’ll find links to highlights from the event.

AI and the robotics revolution

Martial Hebert offers an overview of challenges in AI for robotics and a glimpse at the exciting developments emerging from current research.

Applied machine learning at Facebook

Kim Hazelwood discusses the hardware and software Facebook has designed to meet its scale needs.

Decoding the human genome with deep learning

How can machine learning decode the mysteries of life? Olga Troyanskaya explores this and other big questions through the prism of deep learning.

Computational propaganda

Sean Gourley considers the repercussions

Continue reading “Highlights from the O’Reilly Artificial Intelligence Conference in New York 2019”