Use Google Assistant to Become an HQ Trivia Pro


This post is by Emily Long from Lifehacker


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Want to master HQ Trivia on your own time? Google Assistant can help you with that.

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Use Google Assistant to Become an HQ Trivia Pro


This post is by Emily Long from Lifehacker


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Want to master HQ Trivia on your own time? Google Assistant can help you with that.

Read more…

Is Europe closing in on an antitrust fix for surveillance technologists?


This post is by Natasha Lomas from TechCrunch


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The German Federal Cartel Office’s decision to order Facebook to change how it processes users’ personal data this week is a sign the antitrust tide could at last be turning against platform power.

One European Commission source we spoke to, who was commenting in a personal capacity, described it as “clearly pioneering” and “a big deal”, even without Facebook being fined a dime.

The FCO’s decision instead bans the social network from linking user data across different platforms it owns, unless it gains people’s consent (nor can it make use of its services contingent on such consent). Facebook is also prohibited from gathering and linking data on users from third party websites, such as via its tracking pixels and social plugins.

The order is not yet in force, and Facebook is appealing, but should it come into force the social network faces being de facto shrunk by having its platforms

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Opera adds a free VPN to its Android browser app


This post is by Jon Russell from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Opera became the first browser-maker to bundle a VPN with its service, and now that effort is expanding to mobile.

The company announced today that its Android browser app will begin offering a free VPN. The feature will be rolled out to beta users on a gradual basis. The VPN is free and unlimited, and it can be set to locations in America, Europe and Asia as well as an ‘optimal’ setting which hooks up the faster available connection. Switching on the VPN means that user traffic data isn’t collected by Opera, while it makes it harder for websites to track location and user data.

There are granular settings too, which include limiting VPN usage to private tabs and switching it off for search engines to get more local results.

Opera previously offered a free VPN app for Android and iOS but that project was closed last year. The new

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How to Set Up Opera’s Mobile VPN for Secure Browsing on Android


This post is by Brendan Hesse from Lifehacker


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




We’ve discussed the importance of using a VPN for web browsing several times before, but almost always in the context of finding a VPN to use alongside your desktop browser (and other activities). However, many mobile developers are baking VPNs directly into their browsers, the latest being Opera on Android.

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How to Join the Beta for Google’s ‘Live Transcribe’ Android App


This post is by Mike Epstein from Lifehacker


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Google announced Monday that it’s launching a beta for a new Android feature called Live Transcribe, which can accurately create written captions from speech on the fly. It’s an accessibility-focused project made to help people with hearing loss communicate without making special arrangements or purchasing expensive…

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Google brings Chrome OS Instant Tethering to more Chromebooks and phones


This post is by Frederic Lardinois from TechCrunch


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Tethering your laptop and phone can be a bit of a hassle. Google’s Chrome OS has long offered a solution called Instant Tethering that makes the process automatic, but so far, this only worked for a small set of Google’s own Chromebooks and phones, starting with the Nexus 6. Now Google is officially bringing this feature to a wider range of devices after testing it behind a Chrome OS flag for a few weeks. With this, Instant Tethering is now available on an additional 15 Chromebooks and over 30 phones.

The promise of Instant Tether is pretty straightforward. Instead of having to turn on the hotspot feature on your phone and then manually connecting to the hotspot from your device (and hopefully remembering to turn it off when you are done), this feature lets you do this once during the setup process and then, when the Chromebook doesn’t have access to

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Daily Crunch: Google launches Live Transcribe


This post is by Anthony Ha from TechCrunch


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The Daily Crunch is TechCrunch’s roundup of our biggest and most important stories. If you’d like to get this delivered to your inbox every day at around 9am Pacific, you can subscribe here:

1. Google intros a pair of Android accessibility features for people with hearing loss

Live Transcribe is, perhaps, the more compelling of the two offerings. As its name implies, the feature transcribes audio in real time, so users with hearing loss can read text, in order to enable a live, two-way conversation.

Meanwhile, Sound Amplifier is designed to filter out ambient and unwanted noise, without boosting the volume on already loud sounds.

2. Amazon’s Audible brings Choose Your Own Adventure stories to Alexa devices

These are professionally performed, voice-controlled narratives from the publisher of the original Choose Your Own Adventure book series, ChooseCo.

3. Bird CEO on scooter startup copycats, unit economics, safety and seasonality

“2018 was

Continue reading “Daily Crunch: Google launches Live Transcribe”

Google intros a pair of Android accessibility features for people with hearing loss


This post is by Brian Heater from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Google this morning unveiled a pair of new Android features for people who are deaf or hard of hearing. As the company notes in a blog post this morning, the WHO estimates that 900 million people will be living with heading loss by 2055. The ubiquity of mobile devices — Android in particular — offers a promising potential to help open the lines of communication.

Live Transcribe is, perhaps, the more compelling of the two offerings. As its name implies, the feature transcribes audio in real-time, so users with hearing loss can read text, in order to enable a live, two-way conversation. It defaults to white text on a black background, making it easier to read and can also connect to external microphones for better results.

The feature leverages much of the company’s work in speech to text and translation. It starts rolling out today in limited beta for Pixel

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First China, now Starbucks gets an ambitious VC-funded rival in Indonesia


This post is by Jon Russell from TechCrunch


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Asia’s venture capital-backed startups are gunning for Starbucks .

In China, the U.S. coffee giant is being pushed by Luckin Coffee, a $2.2 billion challenger surfing China’s on-demand wave, and on the real estate side, where WeWork China has just unveiled an on-demand product that could tempt people who go to Starbucks to kill time or work.

That trend is picking up in Indonesia, the world’s fourth largest country and Southeast Asia’s largest economy, where an on-demand challenger named Fore Coffee has fuelled up for a fight after it raised $8.5 million.

Fore was started in August 2018 when associates at East Ventures, a prolific early-stage investor in Indonesia, decided to test how robust the country’s new digital infrastructure can be. That means it taps into unicorn companies like Grab, Go-Jek and Tokopedia and their army of scooter-based delivery people to get a hot brew out to customers.

Continue reading “First China, now Starbucks gets an ambitious VC-funded rival in Indonesia”

Poor smartphones sales drag LG to first quarterly loss in 2 years


This post is by Jon Russell from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




We’ve written extensively about LG’s struggling mobile business, which has suffered at the hands of aggressive Chinese Android makers, and now that unit has dragged its parent company into posting its first quarterly loss for two years.

The Korean electronics giant is generally in good health — it posted a $2.4 billion profit for 2018 — but its smartphone business’s failings saw it post a loss in Q4 2018, its first quarterly negative since Q4 2016.

Overall, the company posted a KRW 75.7 billion ($67.1 million) operating loss as revenue slid seven percent year-on-year to KRW 15.77 trillion ($13.99 billion). LG said the change was “primarily due to lower sales of mobile products.”

We’ve known for some time that LG’s mobile business is strugglingthe division got another new head last November — but things went from bad to worse in Q4. LG Mobile

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Gmail on mobile gets a fresh coat of Material Design paint


This post is by Frederic Lardinois from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Gmail on mobile will soon get a new look. Google today announced that its mobile email apps for iOS and Android are getting a redesign that is in line with the company’s recent Material Design updates to Gmail, Drive, Calendar and Docs and Site. Indeed, the new UI will look familiar to anybody who has ever used the Gmail web app, including that versions ability to select three different density styles. You’ll also see some new fonts and other visual tweaks. In terms of functionality, the mobile app is also getting a few new features that put it on par with the web version.

Like on the desktop, you can now choose between the default view, as well as a comfortable and compact style.  The default view features a generous amount of white space and the same attachment chips underneath the email preview as the web version. The comfortable view

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Before Changing Phone Carriers, Check OpenSignal’s Mobile Broadband Report 


This post is by Mike Epstein from Lifehacker


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Picking “the best” phone carrier has never been easy, since you never really know what kind of service you’re going to get until you’re already stuck with a new carrier (and/or phone). Thankfully, mobile broadband industry analyst OpenSignal has a few more data points to play with—more than 3 billion per day, in…

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Get Help Waking Up With These Quirky Alarm Clock Apps 


This post is by David Murphy from Lifehacker


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




There’s nothing wrong with your smartphone’s alarms. As long as they wake you up in the morning, they’ve accomplished their primary task, and you should commend them for not forcing you to resort to more extreme measures to get out of bed.

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Politiscope, an app to track Congressional voting records and bills, launches on android devices


This post is by Jonathan Shieber from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Last September two former National Football League players launched an app called Politiscope to track the voting records of members of Congress and the bills that they were introducing — and provide non-partisan information about what those bills and votes would mean to voters.

The pro-football-playing brothers, Walter Powell Jr. and Brandon Williams, launched the app to provide an accurate accounting of what Congressional leadership was doing — something the two felt was necessary given the political climate and the ways in which the traditional sources of education on political issues were being called into question.

“A claim of ‘Fake News’ from the current national leaders in response to unflattering news threatens this nation’s democracy and the concept that this great nation was built upon,” said Powell in a statement when the app first launched in September.

Now the two brothers are expanding Politiscope’s reach by launching the Android version

Continue reading “Politiscope, an app to track Congressional voting records and bills, launches on android devices”

Google starts pulling unvetted Android apps that access call logs and SMS messages


This post is by Zack Whittaker from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Google is removing apps from Google Play that request permission to access call logs and SMS text message data but haven’t been manually vetted by Google staff.

The search and mobile giant said it is part of a move to cut down on apps that have access to sensitive calling and texting data.

Google said in October that Android apps will no longer be allowed to use the legacy permissions as part of a wider push for developers to use newer, more secure and privacy minded APIs. Many apps request access to call logs and texting data to verify two-factor authentication codes, for social sharing, or to replace the phone dialer. But Google acknowledged that this level of access can and has been abused by developers who misuse the permissions to gather sensitive data — or mishandle it altogether.

“Our new policy is designed to ensure that apps asking for these

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Twitter bug revealed some Android users’ private tweets


This post is by Sarah Perez from TechCrunch


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Twitter accidentally revealed some users’ “protected” (aka, private) tweets, the company disclosed this afternoon. The “Protect your Tweets” setting typically allows people to use Twitter in a non-public fashion. These users get to approve who can follow them and who can view their content. For some Android users over a period of several years, that may not have been the case – their tweets were actually made public as a result  of this bug.

The company says that the issue impacted Twitter for Android users who made certain account changes while the “Protect your Tweets” option was turned on.

For example, if the user had changed their account email address, the “Protect your Tweets” setting was disabled.

Spotify launches Car View on Android to make using its app less dangerous behind the wheel


This post is by Sarah Perez from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Spotify is making it easier to use its streaming app in the car, when the phone is connected to the vehicle over Bluetooth. The company today confirmed the launch of a new feature called “Car View,” which is a simplified version of the service’s Now Playing screen that includes larger fonts, bigger buttons, and no distractions from album art. In Car View, you’re only shown the track title and artist, so you can read the screen with just a glance.

The site 9to5Google was the first to spot the feature’s appearance in Spotify’s settings. However, some users have had the option for weeks in what had appeared to be a slow rollout or possibly a test, pre-launch.

Spotify this morning formally announced the launch of Car View in a post to its Community Forums.

The company says the feature is currently available only on Android devices, and only when the

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Flutterwave and Visa launch African consumer payment service GetBarter


This post is by Jonathan Shieber from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Fintech startup Flutterwave has partnered with Visa to launch a consumer payment product for Africa called GetBarter.

The app based offering is aimed at facilitating personal and small merchant payments within countries and across Africa’s national borders. Existing Visa card holders can send and receive funds at home or internationally on GetBarter.

The product also lets non card-holders (those with accounts or mobile wallets on other platforms) create a virtual Visa card to link to the app.  A Visa spokesperson confirmed the product partnership.

GetBarter allows Flutterwave—which has scaled as a payment gateway for big companies through its Rave product—to pivot

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Twitter’s de-algorithmizing ‘sparkle button’ rolls out on Android


This post is by Lucas Matney from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




After launching on iOS, Twitter is giving Android users the ability to easily switch between seeing the reverse-chronological “latest tweets” and the algorithmic “top tweets” feeds on their home page. The company announced the rollout at a media event in New York.

The “sparkle button” is a way for Twitter to appease long-time power tweeters while also shifting more of its user base to the algorithmic feed which the company says has served to increase the number of conversations happening on the platform.

You can read more about the company’s algorithmic feed thinking here: