YouTube demonetizes anti-vaccination videos


This post is by Catherine Shu from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




YouTube will demonetize channels that promote anti-vaccination views, after a report by BuzzFeed News found ads, including from health companies, running before anti-vax videos. The platform will also place a new information panel that links to the Wikipedia entry on “vaccine hesitancy” before anti-vax videos. Information panels (part of YouTube’s efforts to combat misinformation) about the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine had already appeared in front of anti-vaccination videos that mentioned it.

In a statement to BuzzFeed News, a YouTube spokesperson said “we have strict policies that govern what videos we allow ads to appear on, and videos that promote anti-vaccination content are a violation of those policies. We enforce these policies vigorously, and if we find a video that violates them, we immediately take action and remove ads.”

This is the second issue this week that has prompted YouTube advertisers to suspend their ads BuzzFeed News’

Continue reading “YouTube demonetizes anti-vaccination videos”

Update regulations on medical AI, experts plead


This post is by Devin Coldewey from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The field of medicine is, like other industries and disciplines, in the process of incorporating AI as a standard tool, and it stands to be immensely useful — if it’s properly regulated, argue researchers. Without meaningful and standardized rules, it will be difficult to quantify benefits or prevent disasters issuing from systematic bias or poor implementation.

AI tools, or to be precise, machine learning agents trained to sift through medical data, are popping up in every room in the hospital, from the x-ray machine to the ICU. A well-trained model may spot an anomaly on a lung scan, or hear arrhythmia in a resting patient, faster or more reliably than a nurse or doctor.

At least that’s the theory; and while there’s no reason to doubt that an AI could be very helpful and even save lives, these models amount to medical treatments and must be documented and tested with

Continue reading “Update regulations on medical AI, experts plead”

FDA warning brings controversial young blood transfusion company to a halt


This post is by Taylor Hatmaker from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




On Tuesday, the FDA issued a warning to anyone who might be inclined to give their old bones a jolt with fresh blood harvested from the young.

The idea is pretty far from mainstream, even in Silicon Valley, where the ultra-wealthy have a keen interest in the cutting edge of life-extension science. Still, there’s apparently enough buzz around the practice that the FDA is warning consumers of “unscrupulous actors” who tout the benefits of infusing patients with plasma extracted from youthful donors while extracting literal blood money from their clients:

We have significant public health concerns about the promotion and use of plasma for these purposes. There is no proven clinical benefit of infusion of plasma from young donors to cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent these conditions, and there are risks associated with the use of any plasma product.

Today, we’re alerting consumers and health care providers that treatments using

Continue reading “FDA warning brings controversial young blood transfusion company to a halt”

J&J spends $3.4 billion in cash for Auris Health’s lung cancer diagnostics and surgical robots


This post is by Jonathan Shieber from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Johnson & Johnson’s robotic surgery and medical device division, Ethicon, is dropping $3.4 billion in cash to pick up Auris Health, a developer of robotic diagnostics and surgical devices initially focused on detecting and treating lung cancer.

The healthcare giant said an additional $2.35 billion in payouts may be possible if Auris hits certain milestones.

Auris’ acquisition is likely a windfall for investors including Lux Capital and Coatue Management, which both invested as part of a whopping $280 million round the company closed two years ago.

Founded by serial entrepreneur Fred Moll, whose previous companies included the 22-year-old, publicly traded Intuitive Surgical, a robotic surgical systems manufacturer now worth around $61.4 billion, and Hansen Medical, a company that developed tools to manipulate catheters; Auris recently received approval from the

Continue reading “J&J spends $3.4 billion in cash for Auris Health’s lung cancer diagnostics and surgical robots”

DARPA wants smart bandages for wounded warriors


This post is by Devin Coldewey from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Nowhere is prompt and effective medical treatment more important than on the battlefield, where injuries are severe and conditions dangerous. DARPA thinks that outcomes can be improved by the use of intelligent bandages and other systems that predict and automatically react to the patient’s needs.

Ordinary cuts and scrapes just need a bit of shelter and time and your amazing immune system takes care of things. But soldiers not only receive far graver wounds, but under complex conditions that are not just a barrier to healing but unpredictably so.

DARPA’s Bioelectronics for Tissue Regeneration program, or BETR, will help fund new treatments and devices that “closely track the progress of the wound and then stimulate healing processes in real time to optimize tissue repair and regeneration.”

“Wounds are living environments and the conditions change quickly as cells and tissues communicate and attempt to repair,” said Paul Sheehan, BETR program

Continue reading “DARPA wants smart bandages for wounded warriors”

Mental health startup Lantern will continue to live through IP licensing deals


This post is by Megan Rose Dickey from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




After winding down its consumer-oriented operations last July, mental health startup Lantern has partnered with larger mental health providers to license its IP. In addition to licensing its IP to Omada Health, Lantern has licensed its tech to Spring Health, Ginger.io and two others.

Spring Health, which offers mental health benefits for large employers, provides personalized, clinically proven approaches to mental health care for employees. But Spring Health has always wanted to integrate digital cognitive behavioral therapy into its approach, Spring Health CEO April Koh told TechCrunch.

Spring Health has already offered psychiatry, therapy and self-help tools, but it was wanting to refer people to digital CBT, Koh said.

“There was really only one player that was committed to evidence as deeply as we were and that was Lantern,” she said. “So when the opportunity presented itself, we were thrilled.”

CBT is a clinically validated approach that examines

Continue reading “Mental health startup Lantern will continue to live through IP licensing deals”

Live: Ask the ‘Am I Dying?!’ Doctors Your Pressing Health Questions 


This post is by Tim Mulkerin from Lifehacker


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Aaaaand we’re live! Until 2 pm EST, cardiologists Christopher Kelly, M.D., M.S., and Marc Eisenberg, M.D., F.A.C.C.—authors of the Am I Dying?! book—will be in the comments section below to address any health concerns you have. (If you need inspiration, check out our last Q&A with them.)

Read more…

Are You Dying? Ask Two Cardiologists Your Health Questions Tomorrow at 1 PM EST


This post is by Tim Mulkerin from Lifehacker


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




So: That weird clicking sound in your knee is back again. And today, you randomly got nauseated for like an hour but then it went away and now you kinda have a headache. Oh god, didn’t you read somewhere that that’s the sign of an oncoming stroke? Does anyone else smell burned toast?

Read more…

Apple partners with VA to bring Health Records to veterans


This post is by Sarah Perez from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Apple announced this morning it has partnered with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to make the Health Records feature on iPhones available to veterans. The deal will allow the veterans to view their medical information across participating institutions, including the VA, organized in the Apple Health app.

These health records include allergies, conditions, immunizations, lab results, medications, procedures and vitals, and will be displayed alongside other information, like Apple Watch data. This gives VA patients a more comprehensive view of their medical history and health data, Apple says.

The medical information is also secured through encryption and protected by the iPhone user’s passcode, Touch ID or Face ID.

Apple was reported to be in discussions with the Department of Veterans Affairs about this deal back in November of last year. At the time, it was said that in addition to the health record integration on iPhones, Apple would

Continue reading “Apple partners with VA to bring Health Records to veterans”

Two former Qualcomm engineers are using AI to fix China’s healthcare problem


This post is by Rita Liao from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Artificial intelligence is widely heralded as something that could disrupt the jobs market across the board — potentially eating into careers as varied as accountants, advertising agents, reporters and more — but there are some industries in dire need of assistance where AI could make a wholly positive impact, a core one being healthcare.

Despite being the world’s second-largest economy, China is still coping with a serious shortage of medical resources. In 2015, the country had 1.8 physicians per 1,000 citizens, according to data compiled by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. That figure puts China behind the U.S. at 2.6 and was well below the OECD average of 3.4.

The undersupply means a nation of overworked doctors who constantly struggle to finish screening patient scans. Misdiagnoses inevitably follow. Spotting the demand, forward-thinking engineers and healthcare professionals move to get deep learning into analyzing medical

12 sigma

Continue reading “Two former Qualcomm engineers are using AI to fix China’s healthcare problem”

Extend Fertility banks $15M Series A to help women freeze their eggs


This post is by Kate Clark from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Fertility services are raising venture cash left and right. Last week, it was Dadi, a sperm storage startup that nabbed a $2 million seed round. This week, it’s Extend Fertility, which helps women preserve their fertility through egg freezing.

Headquartered in New York, the business has secured a $15 million Series A investment from Regal Healthcare Capital Partners to expand its fertility services, which also include infertility treatments, such as in vitro and intrauterine insemination. The company has also appointed Anne Hogarty, the former chief business officer at Prelude Fertility and vice president of international business at BuzzFeed, to the role of chief executive officer. Hogarty replaces Extend Fertility co-founder Ilaina Edison, who had held the C-level title since the business launched in 2016. Edison will remain on the startup’s board of directors.

Extend Fertility, in its New York cryopreservation and embryology lab and treatment center, completed 1,000 egg-freezing cycles in 2018.

Continue reading “Extend Fertility banks $15M Series A to help women freeze their eggs”

When to Check if You’re Hangry


This post is by Nick Douglas from Lifehacker


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The most crucial moment of my day is the first three minutes after I get home. I’m at my lowest point. If I’m asked to make a decision or address a problem, I will answer uselessly or irritably. I can’t eliminate that small stupid period. But I’ve figured out how to work around it, by paying attention to my body.

Read more…

MIT’s insulin pill could replace injections for people with diabetes


This post is by Brian Heater from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Insulin pills have long been a kind of Holy Grail for people living with diabetes. A research team at MIT believes it may have taken an important step toward that dream with a new blueberry-sized capsule made of compressed insulin.

Once ingested, water dissolves a disk of sugar, using a spring to release a tiny needle made up almost entirely of freeze-dried insulin. The needle is injected into the stomach — which the patient can’t feel, owing to a lack of pain receptors in the stomach. Once the injection has occurred, the needle can break down in the digestive tract.

The pill is able to orient itself once swallowed, in order to make sure it injects in the right spot. That bit was apparently inspired by tortoise shells.

According to MIT, “The researchers drew their inspiration for the self-orientation feature from a tortoise known as the leopard tortoise. This tortoise,

Continue reading “MIT’s insulin pill could replace injections for people with diabetes”

Meditation app Calm hits unicorn status with fresh $88 million funding


This post is by Jordan Crook from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Calm, the meditation and wellness app that launched back in 2012, has today announced the close of an $88 million Series B financing with a valuation of $1 billion. (We have not been able to clarify whether the valuation was post- or pre-money.)

The funding was led by TPG Growth, with participation from CAA and existing investors Insight Venture Partners and Sound Ventures.

As meditation grows in popularity across the U.S. — the CDC says it tripled from 4.1 percent in 2012 to 14.2 percent in 2017 — Calm has capitalized on the craze by offering a suite of mindfulness and wellness tools, from guided meditation sessions to a product called “Sleep Stories,” via a subscription.

But Calm is also meeting stress where it lives. For example, the company invested $3 million in XPresSpa late in 2018. XPresSpa is a chain of quick spa stores found

Continue reading “Meditation app Calm hits unicorn status with fresh $88 million funding”

Healthcare by 2028 will be doctor-directed, patient-owned and powered by visual technologies


This post is by Jonathan Shieber from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Visual assessment is critical to healthcare – whether that is a doctor peering down your throat as you say “ahhh” or an MRI of your brain. Since the X-ray was invented in 1895, medical imaging has evolved into many modalities that empower clinicians to see into and assess the human body.  Recent advances in visual sensors, computer vision and compute power are currently powering a new wave of innovation in legacy visual technologies(like the X-Ray and MRI) and sparking entirely new realms of medical practice, such as genomics.

Over the next 10 years, healthcare workflows will become mostly digitized, with wide swaths of personal data captured and computer vision, along with artificial

Continue reading “Healthcare by 2028 will be doctor-directed, patient-owned and powered by visual technologies”

Little Spoon gets $7M for its organic baby food delivery service


This post is by Kate Clark from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Little Spoon, a startup producing modular packages of nutritional, direct-to-consumer baby food, has raised a $7 million round of funding lead by Vaultier7.

The subscription-based service delivers meals — a fixed $3 apiece — to customers’ doorsteps. To date, Little Spoon said it has delivered 1 million meals. Other investors in the round include Kairos, Chobani’s executive vice president of sales Kyle O’Brien, Tinder founders Sean Rad and Justin Mateen, Interplay Ventures, the San Francisco 49ers and SoGal Ventures.

Among the business’s co-founders are Michelle Muller, chief executive officer Ben Lewis, chief product officer Angela Vranich and chief marketing officer Lisa Barnett, a former partner at Dorm Room Fund and Sherpa Foundry. The four launched the company a little over a year ago out of New York. Today, the site offers a rotating menu of 50 different recipes and 80 different ingredients.

“Our success is a testament to what we

Continue reading “Little Spoon gets $7M for its organic baby food delivery service”

Ritual raises $25M for its subscription-based women’s daily vitamin


This post is by Kate Clark from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




In the era of #spirtual and #physical #wellness, everything needs to be Instagrammable, even dietary supplements.

Ritual, a subscription-based service that charges customers $30 per month for shipments of its women’s daily or prenatal vitamins, has effectively tapped into that Instagram crowd. The company admits its social media strategy has been key to harnessing a cult following of wellness enthusiasts. Since it was founded in 2015, the business has sold 1 million bottles of vitamins; today, it’s announcing a $25 million Series B funding led by Lisa Wu at Norwest Venture Partners, with participation from Kirsten Green at Forerunner Ventures and Brian Singerman at Founders Fund.

Wu, as part of the round, will join Ritual’s board of directors.

“We were the first to market in our space to have really built a direct-to-consumer brand in the vitamin supplement industry,” founder and chief executive officer Katerina Schneider told TechCrunch. “For us,

Continue reading “Ritual raises $25M for its subscription-based women’s daily vitamin”

Thriva expands its range of test-at-home kits to add female hormone and cortisol stress tests


This post is by Natasha Lomas from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




UK home health analysis kit startup Thriva is adding three more products to its range later this month: A saliva-based cortisol stress test and two female hormone kits.

The Seedcamp-backed UK startup has been offering blood-prick-based health monitoring kits since 2016, and says it’s had more than 50,000 customers sign up to stab their own finger with its spring-loaded plastic lancet and massage a drop of blood into a tube to post away for lab-based analysis.

The new saliva kit lowers the barrier to entry for DIY ‘quantified selfers’ by only requiring the recipient chew on a piece of material, and remember to do so four times the same day, before sending it away for analysis of their cortisol levels — with a result promised within 48 hours.

Thriva says the idea is to offer a snapshot of a person’s stress levels across the day to “help users to

Continue reading “Thriva expands its range of test-at-home kits to add female hormone and cortisol stress tests”

Spotify, eBay set standard for fertility benefits, study finds


This post is by Kate Clark from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The technology sector awards women and same-sex couples the most comprehensive fertility benefit packages, according to a survey by FertilityIQ, an online platform for fertility patients to review doctors and research treatments.

The company asked 30,000 in vitro fertilisation (IVF) patients across industries about their employers’ — or their spouse’s employer’s’ — 2019 fertility treatment policy, and allocated points based on their support for IVF procedures and egg freezing, among other services.

Silicon Valley semiconductor business Analog Devices and eBay led the ranking. The two companies offer employees unlimited IVF cycles with no pre-authorization requirement, meaning employees do not need permission from insurance providers before seeking certain medical services. Pre-authorization has historically impacted lesbian, gay or unpartnered employees from accessing care quickly or at all, FertilityIQ co-founder Jake Anderson explained

Spotify, Adobe, Lyft, Facebook and Pinterest were amongst the highest-ranked technology businesses, too.

“I think a lot of people

Continue reading “Spotify, eBay set standard for fertility benefits, study finds”

Juul Labs hires former Apple employee to lead the fight against counterfeits


This post is by Jordan Crook from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Juul Labs, the e-cig company under fire for its product’s popularity with young people, has brought on a new VP of Intellectual Property Protection with Adrian Punderson, formerly of PwC and Apple.

Punderson’s job is all about working alongside government agencies, as well as Juul Labs Intellectual Property VP Wayne Sobon, to combat the sale of counterfeit and infringing products. These can range from copycat vapes and pods that are actually marketed as Juul products all the way to products that are designed specifically to be Juul compatible without using the trademark.

These counterfeit and infringing products pose a serious threat to the company. Of course, no business wants its products infringed or its marketshare stolen.

With Juul, however, it’s far more complicated. Juul Labs is currently under heavy FDA scrutiny over the popularity of its products with minors.

“As you start to enforce generally on the sale of

Continue reading “Juul Labs hires former Apple employee to lead the fight against counterfeits”