How to post to multiple social networks


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


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If you’re active on several social networks, it can be a real pain trying to keep up with all your accounts. When you want to spread around some photos of your vacation, get some recommendations for your next phone, or simply complain about the weather, having to go to each service and send the same message to each — and then return to each so you can follow any responses — is time-consuming and inconvenient, to say the least.

One way around it is to use a social network manager that lets you monitor, and post to, more than one social network at a time. These handy tools used to be more available to day-to-day users, but are now, for the most part, mainly selling their services to businesses who want to use social networking for…

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How to replace Google’s Trips app


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


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Google’s travel app Trips is shutting down on August 5th, ceding its territory to apps such as TripIt and RoadTrippers. It’s unfortunate; Trips was a handy app for travelers, offering a quick and easy way to track your travel plans, find your saved places, and explore unfamiliar territory. You could also download your information to the app so that it would be accessible offline, very handy when you are overseas and using a temporary data plan.

Google has created a page describing all the various methods you can use to replace the features of the soon-to-be-gone Trips app. What follows are some of Google’s suggestions, with a bit of extra commentary to help you get at least some of the same functionality:

  • You can use Google Maps to find…

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How to back up your Google Photos


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


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So now that automatic synchronization between Google Photos and Google Drive is going away, how can you be sure that your photos and videos are being backed up safely?

It’s actually pretty simple. Your photos can be backed up to Google Photos either via its mobile app or using Google’s Backup and Sync application for Windows and macOS systems.

A couple of notes first. If you decide to remove the Photos app from your Android phone, the Backup and Sync will not automatically turn off, so you’ll want to turn it off before you get rid of the app. (This is not the case with iPhones.)

If you upload your photos in what Google calls “High quality” (in other words, using Google’s compression), they won’t count against your storage quota….

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Android 101: How to download or share a Google Photos album


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


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One thing Google really wants you to do is, well, stay in Google — because the more you do things the Google way, the more data the company can monetize. The result is that while it is possible to pull your emails, photos, and other material outside of the Googleverse, it’s just a little bit more difficult.

For example, let’s say you want to show an album of family photos that are stored on Google Photos to your favorite grandparent. If they’re reasonably Google-savvy, it’s not a problem at all; you just share the album with them.

Share a Photos album on the web

  1. Click on “Albums” in the left menu.
  2. Hover the cursor over the album you want to share and click on the three dots.
  3. Click on “Share album.”

Another way to go:

  1. C…

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Apple’s new Mac Pro vs. the iMac Pro: Is it worth upgrading?


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


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Modularity is the word of the day as far as Apple’s newly announced and redesigned Mac Pro is concerned. The computer features a return to the older “cheese-grater” look, but redesigned and with a strong eye toward flexibility and expansion.

The question for owners of the most recent desktop Mac powerhouse, the iMac Pro, will be: Should I abandon my current system for the new Mac Pro, which will start at $5,999? (The iMac Pro starts at $4,999, but includes a 27-inch 5K display.) We took a look at the specs of the current iMac Pro, which launched back in December of 2017, and what was announced today for the new Mac Pro, which will ship this fall.

B…

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How to watch today’s Apple WWDC keynote


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


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There’s the spicy smell of Apple in the air, which means it’s time for this year’s Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC). The keynote will start at 10AM PT on Monday, June 3rd, and it promises to be a very interesting one indeed.

What should you expect? There’s no saying for sure, of course, but there are some fairly strong rumors about what’s coming. A preview of iOS 13 (including a much-anticipated dark mode). A mysterious project codenamed “Marzipan” which may provide an easier way to get iOS apps on the Mac. A shiny new desktop Mac Pro along with a 31.6-inch, 6K display (in case you’re tired of running games on your iPad). And perhaps some more info on Apple’s upcoming tvOS 13.

Anything more? Very possibly, but in order to find out,…

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How to watch space launches


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


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George Méliès’ 1902 film A Trip to the Moon has been watched by countless film and science fiction buffs. Besides its innovative (for the time) effects, one reason for its enduring popularity is humanity’s fascination with the idea of space travel. Today, however, we have an advantage that has nothing to do with special effects. We can watch real rockets go to space.

Most of us aren’t aware of how many launches take place each year. Besides flights to and from the International Space Station (ISS), there are satellites being sent into orbit, exploratory craft, and new technologies being tested. And because current technologies allow us to view the process to a greater extent than ever before (with more actual footage and less reliance on…

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How to prompt your memory with Google Photos


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


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Memory is a tricky thing. Some of us are great at attaching names to faces, while others (and here I raise my hand) have always had a problem with remembering names, especially when you meet someone out of context. For example, imagine the embarrassment when someone you know from work suddenly shows up at a friend’s party, and you spend the next hour trying to remember their name.

As a result, I’m always looking for a way to be able to put a name with a face. While there are some mobile apps that claim to be able to help with that, I haven’t found any decent ones for my Android phone. (The only app that really worked for me, Evernote Hello, was killed back in 2015.) However, there is one app that can help jog a faulty memory: Google…

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How to stop Google from keeping your voice recordings


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


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Home assistants such as Alexa and Google Assistant are becoming ubiquitous, and as that happens, more and more users are discovering how much of their data is actually being collected by these handy items. The Washington Post’s Geoffrey A. Fowler was so taken aback by the amount of audio material that Amazon collected that he actually made a song out of his clips.

If all this makes you uneasy, you can delete the recordings already made by Alexa and Google Assistant — but of the two, only Google Assistant lets you pause the process so that your voice won’t be recorded in the first place. Here’s how to do it.

Note: These steps assume you are using a web browser. If you want to do it on a mobile device, you still need to do it via the…

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How to watch the Google I/O 2019 keynote


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




There’s a great deal of anticipation surrounding Google’s 2019 I/O developer conference — especially considering all of the leaks and rumors that have already been circulating. As it did last year, the conference is taking place at the Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, California, starting today and running through May 9th. However, most eyes will be on the main kickoff keynote, which starts at 10AM PT (1PM ET).

We’re sure to hear a lot about Android Q (especially since we’ve already gotten a good look at the beta), but Google will likely provide a lot more detail for other new features to come. We’re also hoping for a look at the new Pixel 3A and 3A XL phones, which have been the focus of several leaks. There are also a variety…

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How to adjust Android Pie’s adaptive brightness feature


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Sometimes new features that come with updated operating systems turn out to be more trouble than they’re worth. Take Android Pie’s adaptive brightness mode, which is meant to intelligently adapt your phone’s display to your lighting preferences. For some people, it works. But if you’re not one of those people, you can just turn it off.

I recently bought a Pixel XL phone — yes, I know: it’s way out of date, but it was really cheap — that runs Android 9 Pie. Everything seemed great, until the first time I tried to read with the room lights out. The display couldn’t seem to decide how bright it wanted to be. Every minute or so, it would slightly brighten or darken. I wondered whether there was something wrong with my screen, and so I did a…

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Android 101: How to stop location tracking


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


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Location tracking can be very handy — it’s convenient when an app can tell you, say, where the near restaurants or gas stations are — but it’s also a privacy issue. Do you want all your wanderings registered by Google? Are you comfortable knowing that Mark Zuckerberg’s minions know where you are at all times? (Well, not that Mark Zuckerberg has minions, but you know what I mean.)

In this article, we’ll take a look at how to stop location tracking on your Android phone and how to delete your location history from your OS and from some of the more popular apps. As always, note that versions of Android can differ, and many manufacturers use overlays as well, which can change the locations of various commands — but they should be similar…

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Google Assistant’s worst feature is still having to say ‘Hey Google’


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


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Recently, a few of us at The Verge who use Google Assistant devices in our homes started complaining about the whole “Hey Google / OK Google” thing. We all had the same experience: you’d say something like, “Hey Google, set a timer for 12 minutes,” and the expected “Timer set” response would come from a device somewhere else in the house.

In my home, we have that problem all the time. We have three Google Assistant devices (not including our phones), and I can’t count how many times we’d be sitting in the living room, would say, “Hey Google, play The Great British Baking Show from Netflix,” and somewhere above my head, in the second floor bedroom, a voice would explain that it can’t do that.

What is the issue here? Apparently, the voice…

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Spike could be your next Google Inbox substitute


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Google’s email app, Inbox, (along with Google+) has gone to that great Google trashcan in the sky, but there are a number of apps out there that are eager to fill the gap, such as Spark, June.ai, and Spike. The Verge’s Chaim Gartenberg is enthusiastic about Spark, which recently added an Android app, so I thought I’d take a look at Spike, once known as Hop. It hopes to distinguish itself by presenting emails as chats. (I look forward to trying out June.ai as well in the near future.)

Spike is available as a web app and as a macOS, Windows, iOS, or Android app. Its email threads are presented in bubbles, similar to Slack or Facebook Messenger, with the subject of the conversation at top of the page and only the names and icons of the…

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Apple’s ‘show time’ event: how to watch the live stream online


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When Apple CEO Tim Cook faces the cameras at the Steve Jobs Theater in Cupertino today, he’s going to be addressing an audience eager to hear the details of the company’s new ventures. Rumors have been dancing around the internet about Apple’s video-streaming service that’s going to take on competitors Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, and Hulu; and the subscription service that will (the company hopes) make Apple News a major information powerhouse.

Curious? You can check out the latest on our Apple hub. But if you want to find out what’s happening as it’s happening, you can watch along with us. The Verge’s reporters will be live-blogging, tweeting, and Instagramming their takes on the events as they unroll. Here’s where to catch all the…

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How to use Android Pie’s search bar to control your phone’s settings


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


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<img alt="" src="https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/xymvfvLNhkwgfeyqkCck_RddREQ=/0x0:2040x1360/1310x873/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_image/image/63174022/akrales_180813_2827_0034.0.jpg" />

When Android 9 Pie was introduced last year, it brought with it a new feature called Slices, which would allow features from third-party apps to exist within the Android interface. While you’ve been able to ask Google Assistant to toggle some things on and off for a while, the latest implementation of Slices has made it easier to access a variety of Android settings from within Google search — assuming, of course, that your Pixel is equipped with Pie.

It’s very simple: search on something like Bluetooth or Night Light using the Google search box on the home screen. The last choice on the search drop-down menu will have a toggle for that feature. We were also able to do a search on “volume” and got an adjustable range.

<a href="https://www.theverge.com/2019/3/4/18250422/how-to-use-android-pie-slices-search-bar-phone-settings">Continue reading&hellip;</a>

How to battle spam on your landline phone


This post is by Barbara Krasnoff from The Verge - All Posts


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<img alt="" src="https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/1GLh7zWLpl_WID8t_dA_Ytyr9-4=/0x0:1020x680/1310x873/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_image/image/63040643/phone1_1020.0.jpg" />

You probably use a cellphone for most (or all) of your calls, assuming you make voice calls at all. However, if you still have a landline, it can be hard to battle the barrage of spam calls that you will inevitably receive. According to a recent report cited in The Washington Post, Americans received 26.3 billion robocalls in 2018, up 46 percent from the previous year.

Unfortunately, landline phones are as vulnerable to spam calls as mobile phones are, especially from (mostly) out-of-country scammers trying to sell you solar panels or vacation homes, convince you that the caller is from the IRS, or bully you into calling back in order to milk your phone bill.

<a href="https://www.theverge.com/2019/2/12/18220804/how-to-stop-phone-spam-landline-scam-calls">Continue reading&hellip;</a>

How to safeguard your UltraViolet library


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<img alt="" src="https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/jxOspPZkmFc1YDvsl1H2CHoRKtg=/0x0:1020x680/1310x873/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_image/image/62974083/20130307-625A3175VERGE.0.jpg" />

The UltraViolet digital locker service is going away, but if you currently have a library of videos and TV shows on the service, there’s no need to panic. As long as your account is linked to at least one retailer, your library should be safe.

We say “should be” because, as this is being written, it looks like UltraViolet hasn’t quite finalized all the details yet. Currently, if you live in the US and are linked to at least one of five retailers — Fandango Now, Kaleidescape, Paramount, Verizon FiOS, or Vudu — then you will still have full access to your library after UltraViolet shuts down on July 31st.

There may still be issues, though. According to its FAQ, “Most, and perhaps all, existing rights in UltraViolet…

<a href="https://www.theverge.com/2019/1/31/18205326/how-to-safeguard-your-ultraviolet-library">Continue reading&hellip;</a>