Four short links: 19 July 2019


This post is by Nat Torkington from All - O'Reilly Media


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Journal Mining, API Use, Better Conversation, and Apollo 11 Source

  1. 73 Million Journal Articles for Text Mining (BoingBoing) — The JNU Data Depot is a joint project between rogue archivist Carl Malamud, bioinformatician Andrew Lynn, and a research team from New Delhi’s Jawaharlal Nehru University: together, they have assembled 73 million journal articles from 1847 to the present day and put them into an airgapped respository that they’re offering to noncommercial third parties who want to perform textual analysis on them to “pull out insights without actually reading the text.”
  2. How Developers Use API Documentation: An Observation Study (ACM) — participants totally mapped to opportunistic (risk-taking, paste-then-adapt, change-without-checking) developers and systematic (start with clean code, read the docs, learn before coding) developers.
  3. TalkAn open source commenting platform focused on better conversation.
  4. Apollo 11Original Apollo 11 Guidance Computer (AGC) source code for the command and lunar

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Acquiring and sharing high-quality data


This post is by Ben Lorica from All - O'Reilly Media


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The O’Reilly Data Show Podcast: Roger Chen on the fair value and decentralized governance of data.

In this episode of the Data Show, I spoke with Roger Chen, co-founder and CEO of Computable Labs, a startup focused on building tools for the creation of data networks and data exchanges. Chen has also served as co-chair of O’Reilly’s Artificial Intelligence Conference since its inception in 2016. This conversation took place the day after Chen and his collaborators released an interesting new white paper, Fair value and decentralized governance of data. Current-generation AI and machine learning technologies rely on large amounts of data, and to the extent they can use their large user bases to create “data silos,” large companies in large countries (like the U.S. and China) enjoy a competitive advantage. With that said, we are awash in articles about the dangers posed by these data silos. Privacy

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Four short links: 18 July 2019


This post is by Nat Torkington from All - O'Reilly Media


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Weird Algorithms, Open Syllabi, Conversational AI, and Quantum Computing

  1. 30 Weird Chess Algorithms (YouTube) — An intricate and lengthy account of several different computer chess topics from my SIGBOVIK 2019 papers. We conduct a tournament of fools with a pile of different weird chess algorithms, ostensibly to quantify how well my other weird program to play color- and piece-blind chess performs. On the way we “learn” about mirrors, arithmetic encoding, perversions of game tree search, spicy oils, and hats.
  2. Open Syllabus Project — as FastCompany explains, the 6M+ syllabi from courses around the world tell us about changing trends in subjects. Not sure how I feel that four of the textbooks I learned on are still in the top 20 (Cormen, Tanenbaum, Silberschatz, Stallings).
  3. Plato — Uber open-sourced its flexible platform for developing conversational AI agents. See also their blog post.
  4. Speediest Quantum Operation Yet (ScienceDaily) — In Professor

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Highlights from the O’Reilly Open Source Software Conference in Portland 2019


This post is by Mac Slocum from All - O'Reilly Media


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Experts explore the role open source software plays in fields as varied as machine learning, blockchain, disaster response, and more.

People from across the open source world are coming together in Portland, Ore. for the O’Reilly Open Source Software Conference (OSCON). Below you’ll find links to highlights from the event.

Better living through software

Tiffani Bell shares three lessons she’s learned exploring how technology can help the less fortunate.

The next age of open innovation

Alison McCauley looks at how blockchain technology offers new tools that can help extend the ethos of open innovation into new areas.

Built to last: Building and growing open source communities

Kay Williams explores key lessons for building strong open source communities based on Microsoft’s real-world experience with Kubernetes and VSCode.

Four short links: 17 July 2019


This post is by Nat Torkington from All - O'Reilly Media


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Margaret Hamilton, WeChat Censorship, Refactoring, and Ancient Games

  1. Margaret Hamilton Interview (The Guardian) — I found a job to support our family at the nearby Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). It was in the laboratory of Prof Edward Lorenz, the father of chaos theory, working on a system to predict weather. He was asking for math majors. To take care of our daughter, we hired a babysitter. Here I learned what a computer was and how to write software. Computer science and software engineering were not yet disciplines; instead, programmers learned on the job. Lorenz’s love for software experimentation was contagious, and I caught the bug.
  2. How WeChat Censors Images in Private Chats (BoingBoing) — WeChat maintains a massive index of the MD5 hashes of every image that Chinese censors have prohibited. When a user sends another user an image that matches one of these hashes, it’s recognized and blocked

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Four short links: 16 July 2019


This post is by Nat Torkington from All - O'Reilly Media


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Quantum TiqTaqToe, Social Media and Depression, Incidents, and Unity ML

  1. Introducing a new game: Quantum TiqTaqToeThis experience was essential to the birth of Quantum TiqTaqToe. In my quest to understand Unity and Quantum Games, I set out to implement a “simple” game to get a handle on how all the different game components worked together. Having a game based on quantum mechanics is one thing; making sure it is fun to play requires an entirely different skill set.
  2. Association of Screen Time and Depression in Adolescence (JAMA) — Time-varying associations between social media, television, and depression were found, which appeared to be more explained by upward social comparison and reinforcing spirals hypotheses than by the displacement hypothesis. (via Slashdot)
  3. CAST HandbookHow to learn more from incidents and accidents.
  4. ML-AgentsUnity Machine Learning Agents Toolkit, open source.

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Managing machine learning in the enterprise: Lessons from banking and health care


This post is by Ben Lorica, Harish Doddi, David Talby from All - O'Reilly Media


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A look at how guidelines from regulated industries can help shape your ML strategy.

As companies use machine learning (ML) and AI technologies across a broader suite of products and services, it’s clear that new tools, best practices, and new organizational structures will be needed. In recent posts, we described requisite foundational technologies needed to sustain machine learning practices within organizations, and specialized tools for model development, model governance, and model operations/testing/monitoring.

What cultural and organizational changes will be needed to accommodate the rise of machine and learning and AI? In this post, we’ll address this question through the lens of one highly regulated industry: financial services. Financial services firms have a rich tradition of being early adopters of many new technologies, and AI is no exception:

Stage of adoption of AI technologies
Figure 1. Stage of adoption of AI technologies (by industry). Image by Ben Lorica.

Alongside health care, another heavily regulated sector, financial services

AI projects in financial services and health care
Model risk management

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Four short links: 15 July 2019


This post is by Nat Torkington from All - O'Reilly Media


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Climbing Robot, Programming and Programming Languages, Media Player, and Burnout Shops

  1. NASA Climbing Robota four-limbed robot named LEMUR (Limbed Excursion Mechanical Utility Robot) can scale rock walls, gripping with hundreds of tiny fishhooks in each of its 16 fingers and using artificial intelligence to find its way around obstacles.
  2. Programming and Programming Languages — a new edition of a book that introduces programming and programming languages at the same time.
  3. IINAThe modern media player for macOS. Open source, and very good.
  4. Job Burnout in Professional and Economic Contexts (PDF) — In recent times, we are seeing the development of new ‘burnout shops’ that are not short-term projects, but are long-term models for doing business. A new word in my lexicon, on a subject of interest to me.

Continue reading Four short links: 15 July 2019.

Four short links: 12 July 2019


This post is by Nat Torkington from All - O'Reilly Media


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Hosting Hate, Releasing, Government Innovation, and Voice Cloning

  1. The Dirty Business of Hosting Hate Online (Gizmodo) — an interesting rundown of who is hosting some of the noxious sites on the web.
  2. Releasing Fast and SlowOur research shows that: rapid releases are more commonly delayed than their non-rapid counterparts; however, rapid releases have shorter delays; rapid releases can be beneficial in terms of reviewing and user-perceived quality; rapidly released software tends to have a higher code churn, a higher test coverage, and a lower average complexity; challenges in rapid releases are related to managing dependencies and certain code aspects—e.g., design debt.
  3. Embracing Innovation in Government (OECD) — a global review that explores how governments are innovating and taking steps to make innovation a routine and integrated practice across the globe.
  4. Learning to Speak Fluently in a Foreign Language: Multilingual Speech Synthesis and Cross-Language Voice Cloning

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Four short links: 11 July 2019


This post is by Nat Torkington from All - O'Reilly Media


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Museum Copyright, Twitter Apprenticeship, AI Regulation, and Computational Biology

  1. The Great Wave: What Hokusai’s Masterpiece Tells Us About Museums, Copyright, and Online Collections TodayIf we consider the customer journey of acquiring a digital image of “The Great Wave” from our 14 museums, a definite trend emerges—the more open the policy of a museum is, the easier it is to obtain its pictures. Like the other open access institutions in our sample group, The Art Institute of Chicago’s collections website makes the process incredibly simple: clicking once on the download icon triggers the download of a high-resolution image. In contrast, undertaking the same process on the British Museum’s website entails mandatory user registration and the submission of personal data.
  2. Introducing the Twitter Engineering Apprenticeship ProgramThrough our new apprenticeship program, participants will go through a one-year rotation program with full-time employment benefits. Upon completion of the program, they

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