iOS 13: Here are the new security and privacy features you might’ve missed


This post is by Zack Whittaker from TechCrunch


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In just a few weeks Apple’s new iOS 13, the thirteenth major iteration of its popular iPhone software, will be out — along with new iPhones and a new iPad version, the aptly named iPadOS. We’ve taken iOS 13 for a spin over the past few weeks — with a focus on the new security and privacy features — to see what’s new and how it all works.

Here’s what you need to know.

You’ll start to see reminders about apps that track your location

1 location track

Ever wonder which apps track your location? Wonder no more. iOS 13 will periodically remind you about apps that are tracking your location in the background. Every so often it will tell you how many times an app has tracked where you’ve been in a recent period of time, along with a small map of the location points. From this screen you can “always allow”

2 location ask
Screen Shot 2019 07 18 at 12.18.38 PM
5 find my
8 contact snoop
6 sign in
4 block callers
7 strip location
9 safari improvements

Continue reading “iOS 13: Here are the new security and privacy features you might’ve missed”

Apple reportedly planning to fund creation of exclusive original podcasts


This post is by Darrell Etherington from TechCrunch


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Apple is said to be planning to bankroll the creation of original podcasts from third-parties that it will offer exclusively on its own streaming services, Bloomberg reports. The report says that Apple’s plans to land podcast exclusives will help the company compete with similar offerings from streaming rivals including Spotify and Sticher, both of which are funding exclusive podcast content, and in some cases, wholly original shows to run on their own streaming audio offerings.

The report says that Apple execs have been reaching out to media companies that produce audio content to talk about the possibility of buying exclusive rights to some podcasts, albeit in a “preliminary” way, which suggests that this plan may be in the very early stages. It seems unlikely, then, that we would see any kind of Apple exclusive original podcast content ahead of other media efforts soon to launch from the company, including its

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What to expect from tomorrow’s antitrust hearing featuring big tech


This post is by Jonathan Shieber from TechCrunch


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Tomorrow, representatives from Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple will testify before Congress in the second hearing organized as part of the House Judiciary Committee’s antitrust investigation into the world’s largest technology companies.

While the first hearing focused on the ways technology companies busted the traditional news business, this one promises to look at the “impact of market power of online platforms on innovation and entrepreneurship,” according to the committee.

Unlike the previous hearing, which featured representatives from media outlets and industry trade organizations attacking or defending the ways in which online advertising had gutted the news business, this latest outing led by Rhode Island Democratic Rep. David Cicilline will have actual tech company execs on hand to answer congressional queries.

One section of the testimony will feature Google’s economic policy head, Adam Cohen; Amazon’s associate general counsel, Nate Sutton; Facebook’s global head of policy, Matt Perault; and Kyle Andeer, Apple’s

Continue reading “What to expect from tomorrow’s antitrust hearing featuring big tech”

Hello HomePod. So Long Sonos & Bose


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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Sonos founder John MacFarlane’s vision of a connected speaker that could wirelessly stream music was too seductive to resist for a broadband and connectivity junkie like me. Even before the product evolved from a concept to design, I was sold on the idea of Sonos and what it represented. For years, the company’s speakers have been the preferred way of listening to music in my tiny apartment. But it is time to say goodbye to Sonos — though, not for the reason you might think.

Yes, most of my Sonos gear is over a decade old and needs an upgrade. And I’m told their new speakers look nicer and sound better than ever (of course, they only need to sound as good as the high-def stream on Spotify). But I am not going to be upgrading with Sonos. This has nothing to do with their core product. The problem is that they are bundling the speakers with voice assistants, specifically Amazon Alexa and Google Home. Yes, you have to turn on these features and enable them for use, but I remain highly suspicious of what can be done surreptitiously. You can blame it on a growing mistrust of the big tech, and their decision making processes. Continue reading “Hello HomePod. So Long Sonos & Bose”

How Roblox avoided the gaming graveyard and grew into a $2.5B company


This post is by Arman Tabatabai from TechCrunch


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There are successful companies that grow fast and garner tons of press. Then there’s Roblox, a company which took at least a decade to hit its stride and has, relative to its current level of success, barely gotten any recognition or attention.

Why has Roblox’s story gone mostly untold? One reason is that it emerged from a whole generation of gaming portals and platforms. Some, like King.com, got lucky or pivoted their business. Others by and large failed.

Once companies like Facebook, Apple and Google got to the gaming scene, it just looked like a bad idea to try to build your own platform — and thus not worth talking about. Added to that, founder and CEO Dave Baszucki seems uninterested in press.

But overall, the problem has been that Roblox just seemed like an insignificant story for many, many years. The company had millions of users, sure. So

GettyImages 1027412388

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Daily Crunch: Apple disables Walkie Talkie app


This post is by Anthony Ha from TechCrunch


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The Daily Crunch is TechCrunch’s roundup of our biggest and most important stories. If you’d like to get this delivered to your inbox every day at around 9am Pacific, you can subscribe here.

1. Apple disables Walkie Talkie app due to vulnerability that could allow iPhone eavesdropping

The Walkie Talkie app on Apple Watch allows two users who have accepted an invite from each other to receive audio chats via a “push to talk” interface reminiscent of the PTT buttons on older cell phones.

Apple has apologized for the bug and for the inconvenience of being unable to use the feature while a fix is made.

2. Amazon invests $700 million to retrain a third of its US workforce by 2025

The company’s stated goal is to “upskill” 100,000 of its U.S. employees for more in-demand jobs by 2025. That’s one in three of Amazon’s U.S. workers.

3.

Continue reading “Daily Crunch: Apple disables Walkie Talkie app”

Apple disables Walkie Talkie app due to vulnerability that could allow iPhone eavesdropping


This post is by Matthew Panzarino from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Apple has disabled the Apple Watch Walkie Talkie app due to an unspecified vulnerability that could allow a person to listen to another customer’s iPhone without consent, the company told TechCrunch this evening.

Apple has apologized for the bug and for the inconvenience of being unable to use the feature while a fix is made.

The Walkie Talkie app on Apple Watch allows two users who have accepted an invite from each other to receive audio chats via a ‘push to talk’ interface reminiscent of the PTT buttons on older cell phones.

A statement from Apple reads:

We were just made aware of a vulnerability related to the Walkie-Talkie app on the Apple Watch and have disabled the function as we quickly fix the issue. We apologize to our customers for the inconvenience and will restore the functionality as soon as possible. Although we are not aware of any use

Continue reading “Apple disables Walkie Talkie app due to vulnerability that could allow iPhone eavesdropping”

Apple has pushed a silent Mac update to remove hidden Zoom web server


This post is by Zack Whittaker from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Apple has released a silent update for Mac users removing a vulnerable component in Zoom, the popular video conferencing app, which allowed websites to automatically add a user to a video call without their permission.

The Cupertino, Calif.-based tech giant told TechCrunch that the update — now released — removes the hidden web server, which Zoom quietly installed on users’ Macs when they installed the app.

Apple said the update does not require any user interaction and is deployed automatically.

The video conferencing giant took flack from users following a public vulnerability disclosure on Monday by Jonathan Leitschuh, in which he described how “any website [could] forcibly join a user to a Zoom call, with their video camera activated, without the user’s permission.” The undocumented web server remained installed even if a user uninstalled Zoom. Leitschuh said this allowed Zoom to reinstall the app without requiring any user

Continue reading “Apple has pushed a silent Mac update to remove hidden Zoom web server”

Apple has pushed a silent Mac update to remove hidden Zoom web server


This post is by Zack Whittaker from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Apple has released a silent update for Mac users removing a vulnerable component in Zoom, the popular video conferencing app, which allowed websites to automatically add a user to a video call without their permission.

The Cupertino, Calif.-based tech giant told TechCrunch that the update — now released — removes the hidden web server, which Zoom quietly installed on users’ Macs when they installed the app.

Apple said the update does not require any user interaction and is deployed automatically.

The video conferencing giant took flack from users following a public vulnerability disclosure on Monday by Jonathan Leitschuh, in which he described how “any website [could] forcibly join a user to a Zoom call, with their video camera activated, without the user’s permission.” The undocumented web server remained installed even if a user uninstalled Zoom. Leitschuh said this allowed Zoom to reinstall the app without requiring any user

Continue reading “Apple has pushed a silent Mac update to remove hidden Zoom web server”

Where to Buy the Discontinued 12-Inch MacBook


This post is by Brendan Hesse from Lifehacker


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Apple made some big changes to its MacBook lineup today—including axing the super-portable 12-inch MacBook, the entry-level MacBook of choice for many. While you can’t buy Apple’s MacBook from its official store anymore, you still have a few options to get your hands on one before they’re gone for good. This also…

Read more…

R.I.P., MacBook


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Eleven years after Steve Jobs introduced it to the world, the original 12-inch MacBook is done and dusted, designated to the scrap heap of laptop designs. The news made me very sad. I have appreciated the design and aesthetics of this machine, and to me, it will always represent the Apple design team’s willingness to dare. Of course, we are living with a whole new Apple these days.

The word is that, with folks buying the new MacBook Air (which boasts Retina screens and powerful machines) and eschewing the MacBook, it makes sense that Apple would cut the old model from its product line-up. But the new Air isn’t for me. (Granted, I am also the guy who will never buy Allbirds or own a Prius.) I will always remain a fan of the MacBook.

As someone with minimalist tendencies, it is not a surprise that I fell in love with the idea of a super-skinny and minimal laptop that could slide into a manila envelope. I was on a hospital bed when Apple introduced the clearly underpowered and feature-challenged notebook in 2008. It was called MacBook Air then, though eventually, it became just a MacBook. The initial response to the laptop was harsh – I mean, everyone hated it. Continue reading “R.I.P., MacBook”

Apple stops selling the 12-inch MacBook, a computer you either loved or were confused by


This post is by Darrell Etherington from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Apple officially stopped selling the 12-inch MacBook today, a computer that hasn’t had an update since June 2017 and that is also maybe one of the most contentious Macs in Apple’s lineup. The 12-inch MacBook at one time seemed like Apple’s path forward (plenty of Apple fans and analysts saw it as a sign of things to come when it launched in 2015), but ultimately ended up representing some of Apple’s biggest challenges with its Macs in general.

The biggest indicator that Apple felt the MacBook was a showcase and crucial product was the name – it was just THE MacBook, without any addition epithets or qualifiers like “Air” or “Pro” (both of which predated its existence. And when it debuted, it brought a number of firsts for Apple’s laptop lineup, including USB-C for both data and power, a keyboard with butterfly mechanisms, a Force Touch trackpad and a new

Continue reading “Apple stops selling the 12-inch MacBook, a computer you either loved or were confused by”

MLB Ballpark app adds Apple Business Chat-powered concierge experience for All-Star game


This post is by Brian Heater from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Just in time for tonight’s Home Run Derby, Major League Baseball is rolling out a new feature on its Ballpark app that utilizes Apple’s Business Chat feature for a customized in-person experience. MLB says it’s the first league to roll out out the feature, letting users ask location specific questions. Though Apple Business Chat has been used for things like drink orders in the past.

Clicking into the Indians section will bring you Progressive Field, the center of this week’s festivities, where you can access the new All-Star Concierge feature. Developed alongside New York-based AI startup Satisfi Labs, the feature is designed to answer simple questions.

IMG 0046

From there, it will either answer straight away or open the appropriate app, like Maps and Calendar. In the case of this week’s events, that could mean something as simple as

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Steve Jobs on Jony Ive


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


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The difference that Jony has made, not only at Apple but in the world, is huge. He is a wickedly intelligent person in allways. He understands business concepts, marketing concepts. He picks stuffup just like that..click. He understands what we do at our core better than anyone. If I had a spiritual partner at Apple, its Jony. Jony and I think up most of the products together and then pull others in and say, “Hey, what do you think about this?” He gets the big picture as well as the most infinitesimal details about each product. And he understands that Apple is a product company. He’s not just a designer. That’s why he works directly for me. He has more operational power than anyone else at Apple except me. There’s no one who can tell him what to do, or to butt out. That’s the way I set Continue reading “Steve Jobs on Jony Ive”

Lee Iacocca & Steve Jobs had in common


This post is by Om Malik from On my Om


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Lee Iacocca, the auto industry legend who was credited with the launch of the Ford Mustang and the revival of a moribund and defunct Chrysler, passed away this week. It prompted me to read as much as I could about him and learn about his methods. I mean, what better way to pay homage to a guy known for his maverick management? Continue reading “Lee Iacocca & Steve Jobs had in common”

Y Combinator-backed Project Wren is aiming to make carbon offsets more consumer friendly


This post is by Jonathan Shieber from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When Landon Brand and Benjamin Stansfield graduated from the University of Southern California this year, they already had the plans for Project Wren, their service for selling carbon offsets to a new generation of conscious consumers.

Along with fellow co-founder Mimi Tran Zambetti (who’s still attending USC), Brand and Stansfield aim to make carbon offsets more accessible to people who may feel like there’s nothing they can do on a personal level to reduce their carbon footprint or support projects that reduce carbon emissions. 

It’s not a novel concept. In 2004, TerraPass launched its service to provide carbon offsets for consumers. The company was acquired in 2014 and now operates as a subsidiary of the publicly traded Canadian retail energy company, Just Energy.

Since TerraPass, other organizations have come in with services to offset consumer and corporate carbon emissions. The Swiss non-profit MyClimate is another organization working on

Continue reading “Y Combinator-backed Project Wren is aiming to make carbon offsets more consumer friendly”

UnitedMasters releases iPhone app for DIY cross-service music distribution


This post is by Darrell Etherington from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Alphabet-backed UnitedMasters, the music label distribution startup and record label alternative that offers artists 100 percent ownership of everything they create, launched its iPhone app today.

The iPhone app works like the service they used to offer only via the web, giving artists the chance to upload their own tracks (from iCloud, Dropbox or directly from text messages), then distribute them to a full range of streaming music platforms, including Spotify, Apple Music, Tidal and more. In exchange for this distribution, as well as analytics on how your music is performing, UnitedMasters takes a 10% share on revenue generated by tracks it distributes, but artists retain full ownership of the content they create.

UnitedMasters also works with brand partners, including Bose, the NBA and AT&T, to place tracks in marketing use across the brand’s properties and distributed content. Music creators are paid out via PayPal once they connect their

UnitedMasters

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Twelve South’s HiRise Wireless is a super versatile wireless smartphone charger


This post is by Darrell Etherington from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Wireless charging has been a wonderful addition to mainstream flagship smartphones including the iPhone, Samsung’s Galaxy lineup and Google’s Pixel phones. But there hasn’t been a really great option for bringing the benefits of wireless charging with you on the road, while keeping your desktop setup tidy until now, with TwelveSouth’s recently released HiRise Wireless.

The HiRise Wireless builds on the good reputation of the existing HiRise line from TwelveSouth, which includes the Duet, a great combo charger for both iPhone and Apple Watch. The Wireless version, as implied by the name, includes wireless charging of up to 10W, which means you get the fastest cable-free charging rate available for devices that support Qi charging, including the iPhone X, XR and XS, as well as the Pixel 3 and Samsung Galaxy S10.

The HiRise is unique in that it provides a charging puck that can both mount in the frame

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