iOS 13: Here are the new security and privacy features you might’ve missed


This post is by Zack Whittaker from TechCrunch


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In just a few weeks Apple’s new iOS 13, the thirteenth major iteration of its popular iPhone software, will be out — along with new iPhones and a new iPad version, the aptly named iPadOS. We’ve taken iOS 13 for a spin over the past few weeks — with a focus on the new security and privacy features — to see what’s new and how it all works.

Here’s what you need to know.

You’ll start to see reminders about apps that track your location

1 location track

Ever wonder which apps track your location? Wonder no more. iOS 13 will periodically remind you about apps that are tracking your location in the background. Every so often it will tell you how many times an app has tracked where you’ve been in a recent period of time, along with a small map of the location points. From this screen you can “always allow”

2 location ask
Screen Shot 2019 07 18 at 12.18.38 PM
5 find my
8 contact snoop
6 sign in
4 block callers
7 strip location
9 safari improvements

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Apple opens app design and development accelerator in China


This post is by Manish Singh from TechCrunch


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Apple has opened a design and development accelerator in Shanghai — its first for China — to help local developers create better apps as the iPhone maker looks to scale its services business in one of its key overseas markets.

At the accelerator, Apple has begun to hold regular lectures, seminars and networking sessions for developers, the company said this week. It is similar to an accelerator it opened in Bangalore about two years ago. In India, where Apple has about half a million app developers, the accelerator program has proven crucially useful, more than three dozen developers who have enrolled for the program have told TechCrunch over the years. Participation in the accelerator is free of cost.

Apple said more than 2.5 million developers from greater China, which includes Taiwan and Hong Kong, actively build apps for its platform. These developers have earned more than $29 billion through

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Apple stops selling the 12-inch MacBook, a computer you either loved or were confused by


This post is by Darrell Etherington from TechCrunch


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Apple officially stopped selling the 12-inch MacBook today, a computer that hasn’t had an update since June 2017 and that is also maybe one of the most contentious Macs in Apple’s lineup. The 12-inch MacBook at one time seemed like Apple’s path forward (plenty of Apple fans and analysts saw it as a sign of things to come when it launched in 2015), but ultimately ended up representing some of Apple’s biggest challenges with its Macs in general.

The biggest indicator that Apple felt the MacBook was a showcase and crucial product was the name – it was just THE MacBook, without any addition epithets or qualifiers like “Air” or “Pro” (both of which predated its existence. And when it debuted, it brought a number of firsts for Apple’s laptop lineup, including USB-C for both data and power, a keyboard with butterfly mechanisms, a Force Touch trackpad and a new

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Use Your iPad as a Secondary Display in macOS Catalina


This post is by David Murphy from Lifehacker


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One of the neater features you’ll find in macOS Catalina—one that definitely got my attention, at least—is Apple’s new “Sidecar” mode. Like a tiny seat attached to a larger motorcycle, Sidecar allows you to link your iPad to your Mac and use it as a secondary display. And if you have an Apple Pencil, you can even…

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Apple’s Sidecar just really *gets* me, you know?


This post is by Darrell Etherington from TechCrunch


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With the rollout of Apple’s public beta software previews of macOS and the new iPadOS, I’ve finally been able to experience first-hand Sidecar, the feature that lets you use an iPad as an external display for your Mac. This is something I’ve been looking to make work since the day the iPad was released, and it’s finally here – and just about everything you could ask for.

These are beta software products, and I’ve definitely encountered a few bugs including my main Mac display blanking out and requiring a restart (that’s totally fine – betas by definition aren’t fully baked). But Sidecar is already a game-changer, and one that I will probably have a hard time living without in future – especially on the road.

Falling nicely into the ‘it just works’ Apple ethos, setting up Sidecar is incredibly simple. As long as your Mac is running macOS 10.

sidecar2

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How to Recreate iOS 13’s Dynamic Wallpaper on Your Mac


This post is by Brendan Hesse from Lifehacker


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The iOS 13 beta has provided us with a preview of the new dynamic backgrounds that iPhone users will be sporting when iOS 13 rolls out to the public this fall. The new backgrounds on iOS 13 shift colors based on whether you’re using the light or dark theme. Static images don’t do this on their own, but since macOS…

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You Can Now Get Your Broken Apple Device Repaired at Best Buy


This post is by Brendan Hesse from Lifehacker


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Apple designs its products to be simple and foolproof, but also nearly impossible for the average user to fix themselves—meaning customers have to go through either an Apple Store, an Apple-approved third-party servicer, or ship their products to Apple for repairs. While plenty of bigger cities have at least one or…

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How to Roll Back From the iOS 13 Beta to iOS 12


This post is by Brendan Hesse from Lifehacker


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The first beta of iOS 13 is out for developers to play with (and craftier Apple fans who like living on the edge), but it’s not all fun and games. While there are some awesome new features beta testers can try out if they install iOS 13 right now, the operating system is incomplete and Apple still has a few more…

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Adobe’s new painting and drawing app will be called Adobe Fresco


This post is by Bryce Durbin from TechCrunch


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Adobe’s upcoming drawing and painting app has an official name: Adobe Fresco. Inspired by the classic technique of applying pigment to wet plaster, the app is intended “to inspire spontaneous creativity.”

The app has been in development under the codename ‘Project Gemini’ and debuted at Adobe’s Max conference in 2018. It will first be available as an iPad app and later for other devices that use touch and stylus inputs.

Fresco will replicate how real-world mediums such as watercolor and oil paints interact with surfaces and each other. These tools are called Live Brushes.

Artists will also be able to use Photoshop brushes such as those created by Kyle Webster (who was hired by Adobe in 2017). For vector enthusiasts, Fresco includes vector brushes to create infinitely scalable drawings in combination with the aforementioned pixel-based brushes.

The app will include layer, masking and selection tools. Files can be

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Facebook collected device data on 187,000 users using banned snooping app


This post is by Zack Whittaker from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Facebook obtained personal and sensitive device data on about 187,000 users of its now-defunct Research app, which Apple banned earlier this year after the app violated its rules.

The social media giant said in a letter to lawmakers — which TechCrunch obtained — that it collected data on 31,000 users in the U.S., including 4,300 teenagers. The rest of the collected data came from users in India.

Earlier this year, a TechCrunch investigation found both Facebook and Google were abusing their Apple-issued enterprise developer certificates, designed to only allow employees to run iPhone and iPad apps used only inside the company. The investigation found the companies were building and providing apps for consumers outside Apple’s App Store, in violation of Apple’s rules. The apps paid users in return for collecting data on how participants used their devices and understand app habits by gaining access to all of the network

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Facebook collected device data on 187,000 users using banned snooping app


This post is by Zack Whittaker from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Facebook obtained personal and sensitive device data on about 187,000 users of its now-defunct Research app, which Apple banned earlier this year after the app violated its rules.

The social media giant said in a letter to lawmakers — which TechCrunch obtained — that it collected data on 31,000 users in the U.S., including 4,300 teenagers. The rest of the collected data came from users in India.

Earlier this year, a TechCrunch investigation found both Facebook and Google were abusing their Apple-issued enterprise developer certificates, designed to only allow employees to run iPhone and iPad apps used only inside the company. The investigation found the companies were building and providing apps for consumers outside Apple’s App Store, in violation of Apple’s rules. The apps paid users in return for collecting data on how participants used their devices and understand app habits by gaining access to all of the network

Continue reading “Facebook collected device data on 187,000 users using banned snooping app”

Google opens its Android security key tech to iPhone and iPad users


This post is by Zack Whittaker from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Google will now allow iPhone and iPad owners to use their Android security key to verify sign-ins, the company said Wednesday.

Last month, the search and mobile giant said it developed a new Bluetooth-based protocol that will allow modern Android 7.0 devices and later to act as a security key for two-factor authentication. Since then, Google said 100,000 users are already using their Android phones as a security key.

Since its debut, the technology was limited to Chrome sign-ins. Now Google says Apple device owners can get the same protections without having to plug anything in.

Signing in to a Google account on an iPad using an Android 7.0 device. (Image: Google)

Security keys are an important security step for users who are particularly at risk of advanced attacks. They’re designed to thwart even the smartest and most resourceful attackers, like nation-state hackers. Instead of a security key

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Postmates taps longtime Apple engineer to lead autonomous delivery efforts


This post is by Kate Clark from TechCrunch


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Postmates has hired Apple veteran and author Ken Kocienda as a principal software engineer at Postmates X, the team building the food delivery company’s semi-autonomous sidewalk rover, Serve.

Kocienda, author of “Creative Selection: Inside Apple’s Design Process During the Golden Age of Steve Jobs,” spent 15 years at Apple focused on human interface design, collaborating with engineers to develop the first iPhone, iPad and Apple Watch. Kocienda left Apple in 2017 to focus on his book.

Now, he’s picked Postmates as his next project, citing the team’s spirit and energy as motivation for joining.

“My goal throughout my career has not been technology for the sake of opportunity, I am interested in making product experiences that people out in the world will find useful and meaningful,” Kocienda tells TechCrunch. “It’s not about the technology or just the design, it’s about the technology and design coming together.”


Postmates unveiled Serve

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The Biggest iPad Changes Coming to iPadOS from WWDC 2019


This post is by Mike Epstein from Lifehacker


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Apple made some really big announcements about the future of all its products during its annual Worldwide developer Conference on Monday — WWDC, for short — but one of the biggest has to be the fact that iPads now have their own operating system, iPadOS. Instead of using iOS, the same software used on the iPhone, the…

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Apple’s new Sidecar feature is great for users, but third-parties take a hit


This post is by Darrell Etherington from TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Apple has a new feature it’s introducing for the Mac in macOS 10.15 Catalina that is admittedly amazing for anyone like me who happens to have both an iPad and a Mac. It’s called ‘Sidecar,’ and it lets you use your iPad as a second display – wired or wirelessly, and with Apple Pencil support for iPads that work with that stylus.

Based on what we saw at Apple’s WWDC 2019 on stage today, this should work pretty seamlessly out of the box, without anything else to install or configure. It’ll also provide support for Mac apps that already work with drawing tablets, including crucial industry stand-by Adobe Creative Suite.

This is basically something that people have been asking for since day one with the iPad, and as with most obvious omissions in Apple software and features, third-parties sprung up to fill the gap. One of the earliest was

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Apple CEO Tim Cook talks WWDC student program, coding initiatives and SAP


This post is by Matthew Panzarino from TechCrunch


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For the past few years, Apple has been inviting student developers to attend its WWDC conference, which centers on development topics and software. A few students from this year’s batch are getting some more personal attention from Apple as it tries to raise awareness of the program and coding literacy via its Swift Playgrounds and other resources for students and teachers.

Most of those students, though, won’t get a surprise personal visit from CEO Tim Cook, which is what happened this week when Lyman High School student Liam Rosenfeld got to the Millenia Mall Apple Store in Orlando, Florida. Liam was there to participate, he thought, in an interview with myself and a local journalist from the Orlando Sentinel about his admission to the program.

As a surprise, and fresh off an appearance at the SAP Sapphire conference to announce an expanded partnership, Cook came to visit the store to

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Marshall continues to impress with new retro portable speakers


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Marshall, the headphone company and not the loudspeaker company of the same vintage, today announced two new portable speakers. Like the company’s previous offerings, these speakers ooze a retro vibe. The two new speakers, the Stockwell II and Tufton, join the Kilburn II, but stand tall, literally and figuratively, apart from the rest of Marshall’s speakers as portable models with a vertical orientation, internal batteries, wireless capabilities and a rugged casing that should survive a trip outside.

The large Tufton impresses with clear, powerful sound even when on battery. The highs carry over a solid low-end. It’s heavy. This isn’t a speaker you want to take backpacking, but, if you did, the casing has an IPX4 water-resistant rating, so it’s tough enough to handle most weather. Marshall says the battery lasts up to six hours.

The smaller Stockwell II is much smaller. The little speaker is about the size

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